Certification Labels From Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories

With so much emphasis put on certification labels from Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories (NRTLs) it becomes just as important to emphasize how much effort it takes to get such certifications. Knowing a little bit more about the ends and outs will help any consumer feel great about the quality control associated with certified products.

 

Certification Labels From Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories

Partnering With NRTLs

The certification that comes from working with an NRTL is more than just a mere label. In fact, when considering the steps it takes to get such a label, it’s kind of a like a diploma. For those manufacturers whose products are certified by UL, Intertek, CSA, or any other reputable testing laboratory, certification amounts to certain rigorous steps and continuing protocol.

The Design Phase: When a company decides to seek the assistance and support of an NRTL for safety and quality assurance, the partnership begins at the drawing board. That’s right, if a manufacturer of electrical products is going to keep things completely safe and as efficient as possible, then everything begins in the design phase. Regardless of whether you’re paying Under Writers Laboratories (UL), Intertek (the organization behind the ETL mark), or Canadian Standards Association (CSA) to help with the process, every one of them is going to start by first assisting in the creation of the product. Before your product is even testable, an NRTL is going to help you design a product that will function as well as it should, and do so in a completely safe and acceptable manner.

The Testing Phase: Once an NRTL has helped a manufacturer design a product that meets all the national and international safety standards (standards that are determined by consensus among NRTLs and OSHA—in the case of the United States) they then begin a long and rigorous testing process. This is where the distinction, Nationally Recognized TESTING Laboratories, comes from. Because that’s the very thing they do. They send every single product with their label on it through a considerable amount of testing to determine that it is durable, safe, and efficient enough to don their distinctive stamp of approval.

The Audit Phase: Even after a detailed design phase and an extensive testing phase, the work isn’t done for those manufacturers that partner with an NRTL. It’s not a one-and-done approach. For any company to maintain the mark of UL, Intertek, CSA, or any other of the testing labs, they have to maintain protocol with all their standards. This is accomplished by completely unannounced audits on production procedures and compliance with standards.

In other words, for any manufacturer wearing the label, there are regular checkups from the respective NRTL officials to make sure the company is still complying with all the protocols addressed and tested in the design and testing phases. These audits happen at random and are executed to ensure that all products bearing the NRTL’s mark are keeping with the standards that warrant it. How often these audits occur depends on the standards associated with the manufacturer’s product type. For Powerblanket, this means the company is audited extensively four times a year by Intertek.

 

Powerblanket and Intertek

Powerblanket is proud to be associated with Intertek and to bear the laboratory’s ETL mark. Our company and engineers pass through the extensive steps and expenses necessary to warrant this label because we care about offering efficient and safe products. At Powerblanket, we don’t cut corners or go with the cheapest parts and labor. Because if we did, we wouldn’t be ETL certified.

As much as we know about what we’re doing, which is more than anyone else, we’re happy to work with a third party entity that checks our work and verifies its quality. So here’s to NRTLs everywhere for helping companies maintain the highest level of quality and safety for their valued customers.

 

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