Got honey? Powerblanket and Dadant team up

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Powerblanket’s Bee Blanket is a crucial piece of equipment for honey producers. That’s why we’re proud to partner with Dadant, an Illinois-based beekeeping supply company that specializes in the finest equipment on the market.

Dadant is the oldest, largest beekeeping supply company in the United States and has been in business for 156 years. The company founder’s family’s seventh generation is still involved in the business today.

Dadant

Early beginnings

It all started with an immigrant entrepreneur, Charles Dadant. Born and raised in eastern France, Dadant fell in love with beekeeping after watching a local priest extract honey from a hive. In 1863, Dadant moved to Illinois where he envisioned growing champagne grapes and raising bees. When his investment in grapes didn’t work out, he turned his full focus to beekeeping. 

By the end of the Civil War, Dadant had nine colonies of honeybees and was well on his way to becoming one of the largest beekeepers in the nation. He employed his son in his efforts, and between the two of them, made innovation after innovation, improving the function of hives and gaining international fame for their work. They also became responsible for translating the 1885 edition of “The Hive and the Honeybee” into multiple languages.

A family effort

Since then, the company has only continued to grow as sons, grandsons, great grandsons, and others stayed loyal to the family business. Dadant keeps the beekeeping world going by supplying beekeeping equipment and publishing the American Bee Journal. With 10 branch locations nationwide and four manufacturing facilities, Dadant is ensuring the art of beekeeping stays alive and well for ages to come. 

Bee Blanket

Protecting honey

Powerblanket offers its Bee Blanket through Dadant, helping promote the beekeeping industry in the United States and Canada. The Bee Blanket adds value to Dadant’s line of products, allowing honey to be kept at a warm temperature without damaging natural enzymes and nutrients. 

For more information about Dadant, visit the company online at www.dadant.com or call 888-922-1293. 

JANUARY POWER MANUFACTURE AWARD WINNER: COX HONEYLAND

With a new year comes a new winner of Powerblanket’s Power Manufacture Award. For the month of January, Cox Honeyland has been chosen to receive this prestigious recognition. We’ve noticed their manufacturing prowess in creating some of the most delicious honey in the Mountain West, and felt the world needed to be aware of this outstanding manufacturer.

Cox Honeyland Power Manufacture Award

Cox Honeyland is a family-run honey business based in Logan, Utah. The company began in St. George, Utah, back in the early 1900s, where members of the Cox family created a bee keeping empire in the desert. Cox Honeyland is the modern incarnation of that same idea, raising bees and churning out honey for the world to enjoy.

One of the unique aspects of honey from Cox Honeyland is the nature of their nectar.  According to the company’s website, their bees travel across the northern Utah mountains to collect nectar from flower blossoms that result in three particular flavors of honey: Clover-Alfalfa (light and mild), Cache Valley (darker with more flavor), and Mountain Snowberry (mountain wildflower flavor). With that honey, Cox Honeyland manufactures a wide variety of products such as beeswax lip balm, honey popcorn and fruited creamed honey.

A spokesperson for Cox Honeyland said the reason they’ve been in business for over 100 years is because of their high manufacturing standards.

“We value our customers and are consistent and dependable,” the spokesperson said, adding that Cox Honeyland is already recognized for many local and state awards for their entrepreneurship. The company is also the recipient of the Golden Hive Award, issued for outstanding beekeeping.

Cox Honeyland will be one of many of this year’s Power Manufacture Award winners. Representatives from Powerblanket will be delivering an award plaque and issuing a Power Manufacture Award badge for Cox Honeyland’s website. The honey manufacturer will also be in the running for the 2019 Power Manufacturer of the Year.

If you’d like to nominate your business for the Power Manufacture Award, contact Powerblanket at [email protected].

Power Manufacture Award

Why Does Honey Crystallize?

Honey comb

It may seem intuitive to assume that crystallized honey is spoiled or poor quality, but this isn’t the case at all. Crystallization happens naturally over time to pure, raw honey and actually helps preserve the nutrients and quality. Additionally, you may find that crystallized honey is easier to spread and richer in flavor.

The Chemistry of Honey Crystals

The “why” behind the crystallization of honey is simple chemistry. Usually, honey contains at least 70% carbohydrates and less than 20% water. This is more sugar than can naturally remain dissolved and over time, crystals begin to form. Some honey crystals are fine and smooth while others are large and gritty. This is largely due to the proportion of the two main types of sugars found in honey, fructose and glucose. While fructose tends to remain dissolved, glucose has a much lower solubility. The higher proportion of glucose honey contains, the more quickly it will crystalize. More rapidly crystallized honey contains finer, smoother crystals. In fact, creamed honey is honey that has been crystallized so rapidly, that the minuscule crystals create a smooth, creamy texture.

Can you de-crystallize honey?

liquid honey

Yes! Honey can easily be de-crystallized in small batches through simple heating. Remember, however, that in order to preserve the natural nutrients found in honey, overly hot temperatures should be avoided.

 

You can easily de-crystallize honey on a stovetop using the following steps:

 

  1. Make sure your honey is in a glass jar or jars (not plastic). Fill a pot with water that comes to ½ to ⅔ up the sides of the jars.
  2. Place honey jars (sans lids) in pot and bring water to a hot but not boiling temperature.
  3. Gently stir honey every few minutes to help break up crystals. Be careful not to splash any hot water into honey jars.
  4. Remove jars from heat when honey is once again smooth and runny.
  5. Tightly seal jars and store in a cool, dry place.

 

How to Keep Honey From Crystallizing

de-crystalizing honey

Remember, crystallized honey happens naturally over time. Some steps, however, can be taken to minimize or delay crystallization.

  • Maintain steady heat (104°-140°F) during honey bottling.
  • Provide a quick, mild heat treatment (140°-160°F) to dissolve any crystals and expel air bubbles that could initiate crystallization.
  • Store honey in proper containers. Air-tight, water safe stainless steel drums are recommended.
  • Store honey in a cool (50°-70°F), dry location. Storage temperatures above 70°F will compromise the quality and nutrients of the honey over time. Refrigerated storage will quickly crystallize honey and should be avoided.

 

Honey Heating Blankets

Powerblanket Bee Blanket

An effective solution to minimizing crystallization during the honey manufacturing process is utilizing a heating blanket.  The Powerblanket Bee Blanket is ideal because it keeps honey at hive temperatures and prevents loss of nutrients or burning from overheating. If you’re in the business of honey, consider adding a Bee Blanket or other method of temperature control to your manufacturing process. While crystallization can’t necessarily be avoided, a Bee Blanket can help keep your honey at the ideal, smooth viscosity.