CONCRETE CURING BLANKETS

Powerblanket heated concrete curing blankets offer a manageable and realistic method for curing concrete in cold and adverse weather conditions. Cold weather can seriously slow down concrete cure time and significantly hold up construction projects. A new concrete pour must maintain a temperature above 50 °F for approximately 48 hours for the necessary chemical reactions to take place to achieve ideal concreting strength. Powerblanket cures concrete 2.8 times faster than a typical insulated blanket and properly maintains moisture throughout the hydrating process. These concrete blankets are easily transported and installed and maintain ACI compliance for cold-weather concreting.

Welcome to the electric concrete blanket that is an ideal solution for maintaining optimum concrete cure time during cold winter conditions. Blankets come in various lengths and sizes, as well as custom options to meet the needs of any project.

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POWERBLANKET CONCRETE BLANKETS

CONCRETE BLANKETS 2.8X FASTER

Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional insulated blankets

3,925 PSI STRENGTH

Produce cold weather concreting strength of 3,925 psi in 72 hours

MAINTAIN MOISTURE

Produce cold weather concreting strength of 3,925 psi in 72 hours

EASY INSTALLATION

Easily Installed and removed

ACI COMPLIANCE

Maintain ACI compliance for cold weather concreting

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Massman Construction & Powerblanket Concrete Blankets

While constructing Kansas City’s Christopher S. Bond Bridge, Massman Construction encountered a mid-winter dilemma. The support beam beneath the bridge, which formed the bottom of the gap in the precast concrete panels, was constantly exposed to temperatures at or below 0⁰F (-18⁰C). Massman concluded that traditional heating solutions wouldn’t work in this case. They turned to Powerblanket heated concrete blankets, which warmed up the surrounding concrete and support beam, keeping a constant temperature on the concrete.

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“We didn’t have the time to wait out the winter for the temperatures to become more moderate. The Powerblanket concrete heating blankets certainly played an important role in keeping us on schedule and not having to postpone the pour on an important Kansas City bridge.”
Dale Helming
Project Manager, Massman Construction
“[Powerblanket] was the best cold-weather concrete heating and curing system we have worked with.”
Vern Adkins
Carpenter Foreman, Walsh Construction
“We gave the engineers at Powerblanket the boundary conditions we had to keep the concrete pour within — at least 46⁰F (8⁰C) at the bottom but no warmer than 82⁰F (28⁰C) at the top. IIt was awfully cold, but the blankets kept the concrete temperatures within spec. We achieved the PSI levels we had targeted, and it was a successful operation.”
Dale Helming
Project Manager, Massman Construction

Electric Concrete Blankets and Walsh Construction

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted Walsh Construction, experts in heavy civil construction, to repair a portion of the Illinois Waterway, connecting Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River. The project focused on repairing two miles of concrete wall with a panel construction during the winter months. This proved challenging because water in concrete can freeze starting at 30⁰F/-1⁰C, and at about 27⁰F/-3⁰C the hydration process can stop entirely. In addition, ice occupies about 9 percent more space than water, threatening the integrity of the concrete. Walsh needed a concrete curing system that could maintain temperature control, did not use an open flame, and would retain moisture in the concrete to save time and labor costs.

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Cold Weather Concreting 50°F is the Magic Number

Experts agree that the best temperature for pouring concrete is between 50-60 °F. Necessary chemical reactions that set and strengthen concrete slow significantly below 50 °F and are almost non-existent below 40 °F. Even when daytime temperatures are within the satisfactory range, winter concrete setting creates risks that could result in weak, inadequate concrete. If nighttime temperatures are below freezing, the water in the concrete will freeze and expand, causing cracks. Additionally, if temperatures reach below 40 °F (but not freezing) during set time, concrete will take much longer to reach required strength. However, if the correct measures are taken, concrete can still be successfully placed during even the coldest months of the year.

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