The Effects of Pouring Concrete in Cold Weather

concrete pouring temperature graphic
First, let’s define cold weather with respect to pouring concrete. Any time you have three consecutive days where the average daily temperature is less than 40°F, or if the temperature is lower than 50°F for less than half of any of the three days–that is undesirably cold for concrete. Pouring concrete in cold weather will have a detrimental affect on concrete curing for several reasons.

How Does Concrete Cure?

Concrete transforms from a liquid to a solid material through a chemical reaction. The speed of the reaction depends upon the temperature of the concrete. When the weather is warm, the reaction proceeds quickly. When it’s cold and the ground hasn’t been thawed, the reaction slows down. That’s the problem: the concrete needs to harden as rapidly as possible to resist pressures caused by water freezing within the concrete.

Slower Chemical Reactions

If the temperature is too cold, the concrete may not have reached a minimum strength of 500 psi soon enough to resist the effects of freezing temperatures. If your concrete isn’t protected with concrete curing blankets after it’s poured, it may cool too rapidly, slowing the chemical reaction.

Poor finishing techniques can also doom your slabs. Freshly poured concrete often bleeds. The water in the mix floats to the top, since it’s the lightest ingredient. Floating or troweling this water into the concrete weakens the top layer. Troweling the concrete too early can seal this bleed water just below the surface as well. If your slab is then exposed to freezing temperatures several days later, this water can freeze and fracture the top layer. Using a concrete curing blanket can eliminate the potential of freezing.

Read how Powerblanket solved concrete issues at the Statue of Liberty.

Concrete Can Be Successfully Poured in Cold Weatherpouring a concrete foundation at a jobsite

How to avoid a bad concrete pour:

  • Never pour concrete on frozen ground, snow, or ice. 
  • Be sure to order air-entrained concrete. Request a heated mix or order 100 lbs of extra cement for each cubic yard of concrete. This extra cement helps develop early strength.
  • Be sure the concrete is ordered with a low slump (drier mix). This minimizes bleed water.
  • After the final finish is completed, cover the concrete with a concrete curing blanket. The heated concrete blanket will prevent freezing and keep the concrete at an optimal curing temperature.
  • After about three days, remove heated concrete blankets to allow the concrete to air dry.

Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets

If you use Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets to pour in cold weather, your cement will cure 2.8 times faster than with conventional insulated blankets. Time and convenience are critical factors when planning out a project in the winter, and Powerblanket has you covered.  Our goal is to provide solutions to problems, and give you total temperature control over every process and aspect of your business.

We Solve Problems

From drum and barrel heaters to pipe wraps and snow melting mats, Powerblanket is dedicated to helping your business grow, saving jobs, and improving your bottom line.   Whether you need to extend the pouring season, or you are trying to survive an early winter, know that you have total temperature control with Powerblanket.

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Powerblanket at the World of Concrete—A Demo in Concrete Curing

Earlier this month, Powerblanket attended the 2015 edition of the World of Concrete at the Las Vegas Convention Center. This year’s exhibition attracted 55,779 registered professionals. In addition, the event drew in 1,459 companies exhibiting their products and services. For Powerblanket and its concrete curing demo, the event proved to be a great way to engage with those in need of the company’s products.

 

 

Powerblanket and the World of Concrete

For Powerblanket, this year’s World of Concrete was an exciting investment of company time and resources. Powerblanket ran a concrete curing demo to demonstrate the effectiveness of Powerblanket® curing blankets on the set times and structural integrity of concrete pours. Those who were present were able to witness for themselves how much efficiency the curing blankets added to the curing process. Not only were the blankets able to cure the concrete nearly three times as fast, but they were also able to increase the strength of the concrete by 50%.

The slab used for the demonstration was 8” thick with a mix design that was formulated to provide a minimal PSI of 4,000 in only two days.  The slab was poured two days prior to the demonstration, and for the purposes of the demonstration, one portion remained unheated while the other section was covered in an MD series Powerblanket® curing blanket. At the beginning of the demonstration, the unheated portion of the concrete measured close to the 4,000 PSI that was required for the minimal target. Then the Powerblanket was added, and the portion of the slab that was heated by the Powerblanket MD Series concrete curing blanket measured a consistent 6,000 PSI after only 16 hours in place. That’s a PSI strength increase of 50% over the unheated portion of the concrete slab.

Powerblanket® curing blankets allow for such efficiency through the company’s patented technological approach to concrete curing and many other heating solutions. Not only do Powerblanket® curing blankets insulate the chemical reactions responsible for concrete heat exchange, but they also add heat to the equation—making them far more efficient than the common curing blanket.  Through the Powerblanket design, electrical heat is evenly distributed through the entire application, allowing for quicker set times and stronger concrete.

“Seeing people’s reactions to the demonstration was exciting,” said Ryan Jensen, Marketing Director for Powerblanket. “It was clear that everyone was impressed with the outcome.”

As a result, Powerblanket has engaged with more customers in an industry they already heavily serve.

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