Concrete Curing in Freezers

Curing concrete in a deep freezer is a unique experience. Walk-in freezers are crucial to any organization that handles temperature sensitive material. The ability to store mass amounts of cold product in a controlled environment allows for meat, ice cream, cadavers, liquid oxygen and more to be used nearly anywhere in the world, so long as there is a freezer to put it in.

Most often, these freezers have a concrete flooring that is specially cured to handle the frozen environment around it, while keeping the heat from nearby room temperatures out. On top of all this, concrete flooring also needs to be able to withstand everything from footsteps to forklifts in ways that mitigate as much repair as possible.

Image taken from www.garonproducts.com

When preparing and pouring cement for freezer floors, there are several steps that one should consider, especially since this isn’t your usual concrete constructing picnic:

  • Maintain the mix: Be sure that your mix of concrete doesn’t contain too much water. Not only is it likely to cause cracking due to shrinkage, but it can also lead to water freezing within the concrete if it’s not cured enough by the time the freezer begins operating.
  • Seal the deal: The United States Dairy Association has a zero-tolerance policy regarding leaks in the freezer space. Frozen food should be stored at 0°F (-18°), as “freezing to 0° F inactivates any microbes — bacteria, yeasts and molds — present in food.” Any leakage would lead to moisture invading the freezer, potentially allowing mold and other harmful bacteria to grow. Any concrete installed as part of a walk-in freezer must be properly set and sealed to prevent leaks from happening.

Restoring Concrete Freezer Floors

With that in mind, you might be wondering how to repair concrete floors in freezers. Damage to the concrete floor like cracking or chipping can happen via forklift accident, replacing glycol heating systems, or subsoil moisture freezing.

Cracking occurs naturally in concrete, and there’s virtually no way to prevent it from ever happening. The best tools for repairing concrete freezer floors are low-temperature grade epoxy seals and additional concrete.

Equally important of what to use is what not to use. Repair product manufacturers like Polycote advocate against hard repair mortar when fixing floor joints. Doing so will create an inflexible bond that will not allow for any concrete movement, increasing the chances of additional concrete cracking.

Things to Keep an Eye Out For

Our friends at Concrete Mender offer several challenges that pose a problem when repairing concrete, which include frost, working conditions, and curing:

  • Frost: Frozen moisture in the concrete will act as a barrier between the repair material and the pores of the concrete. Most repair materials will try to bond to the frost coated concrete. When the temperature increases, the frost melts and so does the bond.
  • Working conditions: Working with materials in the cold is challenging to both man and materials. Mixing epoxies or mortars in the cold is especially challenging. As the temperature decreases, the viscosity and flow rate of these materials increase making them harder to mix and much more difficult to work with. Drum heaters are an excellent solution to keeping epoxy and mortar warm while waiting to use on a freezer job.
  • Curing: With most materials, cure times in cold environments are extended significantly. A product that normally cures in an hour at room temperature may take as much as 12 hours in a cold environment. Some materials may not cure at all before actually freezing solid. Use a concrete curing blanket to help the concrete cure for maximum strength.

If You’re Gonna Do a Job, You’d Better Do It Right

Fixing a freezer is a job you only want to do once. Making crack repairs can be tedious and have to be done exactly to specifications in meeting safety requirements. After all, keeping that freezer sealed tight with a good concrete job will keep the cadavers cold and food frozen.

The best tools to help with a quick, clean concrete repair job are drum heaters and curing blankets. For more information on these items, check out Powerblanket’s concrete solutions.

All About Concrete Cracking Repair

Concrete gets old with age, just like we do. When laid correctly, concrete doesn’t really pose any problems until the cracking and wearing part of the life cycle begins. Concrete cracking happens naturally, but that doesn’t mean you can’t do anything about it. 

Stock Image

Cracking is a constant in concrete. Nearly every slab of concrete ever laid will feature cracking at some point. This can lead to a series of important questions:

  • What is causing the cracking?
  • Is the structural integrity of my concrete compromised due to cracking?
  • Can cracking be repaired without replacing the concrete?
  • What can be done next time to help mitigate cracking?

Concrete Cracking Causes

The Concrete Network lists five causes of concrete cracking: excess water in concrete mix, rapid drying of concrete, improper strength concrete poured, lack of control joints, and poor ground conditions before pouring.

  1. Excess water in concrete mix: Concrete shrinks as it dries thanks to the water within the concrete mix evaporating. Though water is an important part of the concrete mixture, too much water will create a “soupy” concrete mix. When the water evaporates, the remaining concrete shrinks to maintain its strength. According to the Concrete Network, “concrete slabs can shrink as much as 1/2 inch per 100 feet. This shrinkage causes forces in the concrete which literally pull the slab apart. Cracks are the end result of these forces.”

    The best way to mitigate cracking of this type from happening is to be careful with how much water is added to your concrete mix. A low water-to-cement ratio will go a long way in preventing cracking.
  2. Rapid drying of concrete: Concrete will often not be able to achieve its maximum strength if it cures too fast. Hydration is the chemical reaction that allows the cement mixture to absorb water, changing from a liquid mixture into a solid slab. This process can take days, even weeks to become stiff enough to achieve desired strengths. Using a concrete curing blanket can allow less impact from external variables that affect concrete drying.

    Powerblanket image
  3. Improper strength of concrete poured: Not all cement mixes are created equally. Different mixes suit different purposes. You can bet that the concrete slab you poured to make the kids’ basketball court is a different strength than the Normandy bunkers stormed by the Allies on D-Day. Pouring the wrong strength of concrete can set you up for cracking. Check with your concrete provider to ensure you’re using the right strength of concrete for your project.
  4. Lack of control joints: Control joints let you choose where the cracking occurs. By allowing for spacing between concrete slabs, you can make sure cracks happen in straight lines and don’t spread due to temperature fluctuations and movement.

    Image taken from Concrete Construction Magazine

    When control joints aren’t used, cracking will happen in the most natural way possible with no direction from you. Cutting control joints must be done within 12 hours of pouring concrete, or as soon as the concrete has hardened.

  5. Poor ground conditions: Do not pour concrete on frozen ground. The poured concrete will bind to the ice inside of the frozen soil, and will become unbound once the ice melts. If you have to pour concrete in cold weather conditions, use a ground thawing blanket to get ground surfaces to the right temperature. This will ensure proper joining of ground and cement layers. The ground should also be dry, so make sure you’re not pouring concrete into a puddle or saturated soil.

Cracking Impacts Concrete

Structural integrity is what concrete is all about. Properly evaluating the impact of cracking can help you decide if your structure is sustainable, or if you need to replace that part of the project with another concrete pour. Opting to repair your concrete is feasible only once it’s been confirmed there are no structural issues.

Image taken from www.nextstartech.com

Repairing Cracks

Concrete Construction says that if you’ve noticed cracking in your concrete, you’ll want to follow several steps before taking any repair measures:

“Before repairing your next crack, perform a crack evaluation and establish the repair objectives. Decide what type of repair is needed. Choices include a structural repair using epoxy, a route and seal repair using a flexible sealant to accommodate future crack movements, and a hard or semi-rigid filler repair to support crack edges, with or without routing. Also, establish the cosmetic requirements. After choosing the repair material and procedure, follow the manufacturer’s recommendations.”

Stock Image

After completing the crack repair, reassess the area to see how you can blend the look of the repair back into the concrete, giving your project a smoother look.

Cracking: It’s Going to Happen

Though repairing cracking will allow for longer-lasting strength for your concrete, mitigating excessive cracking from happening in the first place is best. It can’t be stopped, but it can be controlled. Refer to the above guide next time you’re on a concrete job to make sure you have all your concrete cracking bases covered.

Check out Powerblanket’s concrete solutions here.

How to Stain Concrete: Stain your way from gloom to glam

Let’s get one thing straight. Plain, gray concrete is best used in military bunkers. Other than that, it’s downright boring. What can you do to spice up your concrete patio, concrete counter-tops, and concrete floors? There’s one solution: stain it. Staining concrete takes time and effort, but the results are beautiful.

Image taken from www.thatisconcrete.com.

Types of Concrete Stain

If you’re a parent, the word “stain” probably doesn’t make you think of something beautiful or decorative. Nonetheless, concrete staining is a great way to turn a slab of gray into luxurious concrete with color or shine. Concrete experts generally use one of two ways to stain concrete: acid and water-based stains. Each one has a specific purpose, but which one should you use?

Acid Concrete Stains

  • Acid stains are made up of metallic salt minerals dissolved into a water-acid mixture. The acid causes a chemical reaction during the curing process that permanently changes the concrete surface color and texture.
Acid stained porch in Colorado. Image taken from www.denverconcretecompany.net.

Non-Acid Concrete Stains

  • Non-acid stains treat concrete differently than an acid stain. Instead of altering the structure of the concrete, non-acid stains create a layer over the concrete surface, filling pores and leaving behind a flat, smooth finish.
Non-acid stained concrete. Image taken from www.super-krete.com.

Concrete Staining Process

Do Your Prepwork

According to industry experts, the best way to stain concrete is as follows:

  • Thoroughly clean and prepare concrete
  • Apply concrete stain
  • Clean up and neutralize concrete stain
  • Seal concrete for lasting protection

In order to stain concrete, the concrete must be cured to its proper strength. This can take up to 48 hours, but with concrete curing products, this time can be nearly cut in half. Powerblanket’s Concrete Curing Blanket helps keep concrete at stable temperatures above 50°F, curing 2.8 times faster than open air curing. This is especially helpful when staining concrete in places where temperatures are variable or close to freezing. Make sure your concrete creation cures correctly.

Once it is cured, you can move on to the concrete staining process. Begin washing down the concrete surface. You don’t want any food crumbs or shoe scuff marks to get in the way of the stain, so make sure to give it a good scrub down. Also remove any layers of glue, sealers or curing membranes that might prevent the stain from coming in full contact with the concrete. Finally, apply a concrete acid cleanser to the project surface to ensure the concrete is as porous as possible. Once it has dried, rinse the concrete with water. Some concrete manufacturers, like Quikrete, even make their own cleaners, etchers, and de-greasers so you know you are using the best products on your concrete.

Let The Staining Begin

After the concrete is no longer wet from rinsing, use a brush or roller to spread the stain across the project surface. If it’s a puddle you can splash in (don’t), it’s too thick. If it disappears right after applying it (i.e. it absorbed into the concrete), you need more.

Once your initial layer is down, allow 24 hours of drying before applying another layer of stain, even if it’s the same stain color.

Most concrete stains have difficulty drying in cold temperatures. If you must do a concrete staining project in the dead of winter, a Concrete Curing Blanket can save the day, allowing the stain to dry within a controlled environment.

Protect Your Project

You’re so close to being done! After the stain has dried, use a sealer or wax to protect the stain from dirt or grime that could change the color or texture over time. You’ll need to regularly clean the concrete surface, but don’t use powerful chemicals like bleach, vinegar or ammonia. Such solutions can damage stained concrete. And you wouldn’t want that, would you?

Image taken from www.kronion.pw.

Finally, bask in your work. Enjoy the fruit of your labors and invite friends and family over to see your decoratively stained concrete.

Concrete Solutions From Powerblanket

All successful projects start with a solid foundation.  Concrete Curing Blankets from Powerblanket ensure your pour cures quickly, strongly, and is ready for the next step in your project.  Contact us today to find a solution for your concrete needs 855.440.0208 or [email protected]

Tips for Pouring Concrete in Winter

When it comes to pouring concrete in winter, weather can pose significant challenges. Concrete sets best at 50-60°F; pouring concrete in winter means the ambient temperature will likely fall well below this range. Fortunately, there are steps you can take to effectively tackle cold weather concrete curing.

snow covered street

Concrete Pouring Temperature Limits

As mentioned above, concrete prefers a mild temperature between around 50 and 60°F to set. Below this, the exothermic reactions that cause wet cement to transform into strong concrete will slow significantly. This could mean long delays in work while you wait for concrete to set and strengthen before continuing with a project. Additionally, If concrete reaches freezing temperatures during the setting process, the water in the cement mix will freeze and expand. This will cause concrete to become weak, brittle and even flaky when it sets.

 

Successfully Pouring Concrete in Winter

Construction site

Fortunately, strategies can be implemented to increase the temperature of cement mixtures. Here are some tricks you can use to keep the cement flowing all winter long:

  • Use heaters or heated blankets to thaw surfaces where concrete will be poured. Pouring concrete on frozen ground will quickly cool concrete well below ideal temperatures. Using a heater to prep surfaces will prevent too-quick cooling or freezing and help keep the necessary reactions going.
  • Mix cement using hot water to help increase the temperature of the concrete.
  • Store materials in a warm location.
  • Use quick-set cement; during cold weather. It may set more slowly than the instructions indicate, but will still harden more quickly than traditional cement mix.
  • Mix in additives that accelerate set time.
  • Use extra cement (typically 100 lb/ cubic yard) to make the reaction hotter and cause concrete to hydrate more rapidly.
  • Utilize squeegees or a vacuum to remove bleed water that has a difficult time evaporating during colder weather.

Cold Weather Concrete Curing

After the concrete has been poured, it needs to be kept at the correct temperature to cure. Most importantly, it needs to be kept from freezing. Ideal temperatures (50-60°F) should be maintained for about 48 hours for the concrete to reach optimal strength as it sets. This can be tricky during the winter; even if temperatures are optimal during the day, they can plummet at nighttime. Maintaining warmer temperature will require some sort of external heat source. One option is a heated enclosure. These are effective but can be time-consuming to install. If you choose to use an enclosure, be aware that excess carbon dioxide from the heater can cause bubbling in the surface of concrete. This can typically be avoided with proper ventilation.

Concrete Blankets

Another option for temperature maintenance during cold weather concrete setting is concrete blankets. Concrete blankets can be used to thaw ground before pouring concrete and again after finishing to keep concrete from freezing. They are easy to install and transport and require only an outlet to use. This means no time wasted setting up complex heating mechanisms. If you’re interested in minimizing downtime involved pouring concrete in winter, these blankets are an excellent heating option to look into.

Concrete Curing Time

concrete pouring down the chute

Waiting for the curing of concrete can easily test patience, especially when you’re ready to move on to the next step of a project. However, it’s important to remember that quality is the end goal, not quickness. Rushing ahead and not allowing enough time for concrete to properly cure before allowing foot traffic or heavy machinery to travel across your newly placed cement can seriously compromise the integrity of a concrete slab.

 

Cement Curing Factors

Several factors influence concrete slab cure time, including:

  • Mixture proportions- Increasing cement to water ratio will decrease setting time but may compromise long-term strength.
  • Type of mix used- Some fast curing concrete mixes and add-ins  are available
  • Specified strength
  • Size and shape of slab
  • Ambient weather/temperature- Higher temperatures decrease initial concrete setting time, but may decrease long-term strength.

 

Typical Concrete Setting Time

Typically, concrete is recognized to have reached full strength 28 days after placement; however, this does not mean you need to wait 28 days to walk, or even continue construction on newly placed concrete. After placement, concrete increases in strength very quickly for 3-7 days, then gradually for the next 3 weeks. This means that concrete hardening time is typically 24-48 hours, at which point it’s safe for normal foot traffic. After one week, concrete is typically cured enough to handle continued construction including heavy machinery.

concrete curing time

The “70 in 7” Rule

When in doubt, remember the “70 in 7” rule: Most concrete mixes will have reached 70% of specified compressive strength after 7 days. At this point, it’s ready for exposure to normal traffic.

concrete curing blanket on ground

Concrete Curing Blankets

Unfortunately, cold weather during winter months can seriously slow down concrete cure time and significantly hold up construction projects. The best temperature to cure concrete is above 5o°F, which can be difficult to replicate if the air is below freezing.

Luckily, solutions, such as concrete curing blankets that maintain optimum temperatures during cure time, are available. Concrete Blankets are an effective option that cure concrete 2.8 times faster than a typical insulated blanket and properly maintain moisture throughout the hydrating process. Concrete Blankets are easily transported and installed and maintain ACI compliance for cold-weather concreting. If you’re looking for a solution to maintaining optimum concrete cure time during cold winter, using a Concrete Blanket is the best method for drying and curing concrete.

Powerblanket Receives the AME Award

Powerblanket Receives The Association for Manufacturing Excellence Award

The Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME) today announced four recipients of the AME 2017 Excellence Award. The AME Excellence Award primarily recognizes North American manufacturing plants that have demonstrated excellence in manufacturing and business. The award acknowledges continuous improvement, best practices, creativity and innovation. Recognized among those four recipients is Powerblanket, the smallest company ever to receive this award.

Powerblanket – Salt Lake City, Utah

The leader in total temperature control, Powerblanket designs and manufactures high technology smart controls and monitoring devices, heating blankets, and chilling products that solve a wide range of temperature problems in industries such as oil and gas, construction, industrial, mining, and railroad. The AME assessment team highlighted Powerblanket’s great culture throughout the company. The team also commended Powerblanket’s improvements and impressive turnaround, especially for only being three years into its lean journey. The award presentation will take place on Oct. 25, 2017.

Powerblanket ground thawing blanket

How It All Started

Powerblanket is a great example of problem solving and innovation in industry. A concrete worker in Salt Lake City, UT wanted to work more efficiently year-round. He worked with an engineering professor at the University of Utah to create an efficient heating technology that would cure concrete quickly and with maximum strength. They developed an innovative concrete heating product and founded Powerblanket, which soon became a leading manufacturer in the concrete industry.  This technology proved to solve many temperature problems for applications across many different industries, and they began wrapping barrels, buckets, pipes, and tanks. From there they developed an expertise in temperature control, built a world-class custom design team, created control devices, and entered the industrial cooling industry with a new line of chillers and cooling blankets.

What started as a solution to a common construction problem, has turned into an industry-leading company that engineers and manufactures temperature control solutions for many different industries all over the world.

More About the AME Award

The AME Excellence Award has a rigorous selection process that begins when a company submits an extensive achievement report based on the AME Excellence Award evaluation criteria. Achievement reports are evaluated by the AME award assessment team. For companies that score high enough in this achievement report review, an intensive site visit is completed, during which a volunteer team of manufacturing practitioners validates the submitted achievement report. Recipients of the Excellence Award are selected based on the combined results of the achievement report review and site visit feedback.

The AME Excellence Award is not something that can be achieved by one person or one company leader. It takes all team members working together to achieve the level of enterprise excellence that the AME Excellence Award recognizes. With that in mind, AME representatives will visit award recipients’ facilities to present awards in person so that everyone working in these facilities can participate in the celebration.

Recipients will also be honored at the AME 2017 International Conference, taking place Oct. 9-13 in Boston, Mass. Recipients will share their best practices with other lean and continuous improvement practitioners in attendance.  

To learn more about the Excellence Award and the 2017 recipients, visit www.ame.org/excellence-awards.

How Cold is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?

 Ground heating electrical blanket for curing concrete
Experts agree that the best temperature to pour concrete is between 50-60 °F. The necessary chemical reactions that set and strengthen concrete slow significantly below 50 °F and are almost non-existent below 40 °F. Even when daytime temperatures are within the satisfactory range, winter concrete setting creates risks that could result in weak, inadequate concrete. If nighttime temperatures are below freezing, the water in the concrete will freeze and expand, causing cracks. Additionally, if temperatures reach below 40 °F (but not freezing) during set time, concrete will take much longer to reach required strength. However, if the correct measures are taken, concrete can still be successfully placed during even the coldest months of the year.

Things to Consider with Cold Weather Concreting

Before embarking on a cold weather concrete project, it’s important to determine any special strength requirements or considerations. This will help as you schedule your pouring and determine which strategies you will use to keep your surroundings and materials warm. The predominant challenge you will face during a winter concrete project is ensuring that the concrete sets before it is exposed to freezing temperatures. You might take the following suggestions into consideration as you plan your upcoming project:

  • Use heaters to thaw frozen ground, snow or ice.
  • Use hot water to mix cement.
  • Keep dry materials in a dry, warm location.
  • Use products designed to set quickly. During cold weather, these products will not set as quickly as the instructions may indicate, but will set faster than conventional materials.
  • Use additives that accelerate set time. Use caution; if additives contain calcium chloride, any rebar or metal wire mesh in concrete will rust and cause concrete to crack.
  • Use extra cement (typically 100 lb/ cubic yard) to make the reaction hotter and cause concrete to hydrate more rapidly.
  • Remember that you still need to wait for bleed water to evaporate. Incorporating the water into the surface during finishing will weaken the surface. Bleeding starts later and takes longer during cold weather; you can use squeegees or a vacuum to remove water quickly.
  • Wait until concrete has reached desired strength to remove any framework. If the framework is removed too early, the concrete will be damaged and the surface could collapse.

Maintaining Ideal Temperature

After implementing the above suggestions, It’s important to consider how you will keep concrete at the correct temperature during the curing process. Concrete must maintain a temperature above 50 °F for approximately 48 hours for the correct chemical reactions to take place. Two popular options used during cold weather concrete curing are heated enclosures and insulated blankets. If using an enclosure, ensure that the structure is both wind and waterproof. Additionally, ensure that there is proper ventilation for the space heater. Heaters cause an increase in carbon dioxide that could cause carbonation in the surface of the concrete.

Powerblanket Concrete Blankets

Powerblanket® concrete blankets are an extremely effective option for attaining and maintaining the correct temperatures for concrete pouring and setting. Powerblanket concrete blankets can be used to thaw ground before pouring concrete and again after finishing to keep concrete from freezing. Utilizing Powerblanket concrete blankets will ensure that concrete is kept at the correct temperature for the necessary reactions to happen quickly and the desired strength to be reached.

 

Heat Authority Sells Powerblanket

Find Powerblanket Products at Heat AuthorityHeat Authority

Heat Authority has researched the leading products for industrial and job-site productivity and offers the widest variety of heating and cooling accessories to make working in any environment easier and more efficient. Cold weather got you stuck? Unfavorable warehouse conditions? Hazardous area environment? Construction site issues? Need better equipment to get the job done? Heat Authority has a product to help solve your problem.

Heat Authority Has It All

With products for almost any industrial application, Heat Authority is one of the very best resources for industrial equipment supply. With a low price promise and FREE shipping on almost every product site-wide, Heat Authority offers heated concrete curing and ground thawing blankets, drum and IBC tote heated jackets, hot plates, furnaces, lighting, machinery, welders & generators, including freeze protection products and warehouse lighting solutions. Construction contractors and utility excavators rely on the light towers heated construction blankets. Warehouse managers and manufacturers demand the drum & tote heaters. Concrete finishers require the concrete curing heated blankets to keep their crews working all winter long.  Everybody loves the low price guarantee on EVERY product site-wide. Heat Authority knows that time is money and do their best to help their customers save money & stay on schedule all season long.

Great Distributor

Distributors like Heat Authority are vital to the success of Powerblanket, and we appreciate and value these partners for all they do to help us deliver heating solutions all over the world. If you are in search of Powerblanket heating solutions, Heat Authority is a trusted and reliable source.

Powerblanket Heating Solutions at Heat Authority Include:

  • Bucket Heaters
  • Tote Heaters
  • Barrel/Drum Heaters
  • Concrete Curing Blankets
  • Bulk Material Warmers
  • Propane Tank Heaters
  • Pipe Warmers
  • Ground Thawing Blankets
  • Spray Foam Heaters
  • Hot Boxes
  • DEF Tote Heaters
  • Tank Heaters

 

What Temperature is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?

What Temperature is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?
What Temperature is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?

Experts agree that the best temperature to pour concrete is between 50-60°F. The necessary chemical reactions that set and strengthen concrete slow significantly below 50°F and are almost non-existent below 40°F. Even when daytime temperatures are within the satisfactory range, winter concrete setting creates risks that could result in weak, inadequate concrete. If nighttime temperatures are below freezing, the water in the concrete will freeze and expand, causing cracks. Additionally, if temperatures reach below 40°F (but not freezing) during set time, concrete will take much longer to reach required strength. However, if the correct measures are taken, concrete can still be successfully placed during even the coldest months of the year.

Before embarking on a cold weather concrete project, it’s important to determine any special strength requirements or considerations. This will help as you schedule your pouring and determine which strategies you will use to keep your surroundings and materials warm. The predominant challenge you will face during a winter concrete project is ensuring that the concrete sets before it is exposed to freezing temperatures. You might take the following suggestions into consideration as you plan your upcoming project:

  • Use heaters to thaw frozen ground, snow or ice.
  • Use hot water to mix cement.
  • Keep dry materials in a dry, warm location.
  • Use products designed to set quickly. During cold weather, these products will not set as quickly as the instructions may indicate, but will set faster than conventional materials.
  • Use additives that accelerate set time. Use caution; if additives contain calcium chloride, any rebar or metal wire mesh in concrete will rust and cause concrete to crack.
  • Use extra cement (typically 100 lb/cubic yard) to make the reaction hotter and cause concrete to hydrate more rapidly.
  • Remember that you still need to wait for bleed water to evaporate. Incorporating the water into the surface during finishing will weaken the surface. Bleeding starts later and takes longer during cold weather; you can use squeegees or a vacuum to remove water quickly.
  • Wait until concrete has reached desired strength to remove any framework. If the framework is removed too early, the concrete will be damaged and the surface could collapse.

After implementing the above suggestions, It’s important to consider how you will keep concrete at the correct temperature during the curing process. Concrete must maintain a temperature above 50°F for approximately 48 hours for the correct chemical reactions to take place, allowing the concrete to eventually settle at 4000 psi. Two popular options used during cold weather concrete curing are heated enclosures and insulated blankets. If using an enclosure, ensure that the structure is both wind and waterproof. Additionally, ensure that there is proper ventilation for the space heater. Heaters cause an increase in carbon dioxide that could cause carbonation in the surface of the concrete, not to mention a work hazard for employees.

Powerblanket® concrete blankets are an extremely effective option for attaining and maintaining the correct temperatures for concrete pouring and setting. Powerblanket® concrete blankets can be used to thaw ground before pouring concrete and again after finishing to keep concrete from freezing. Utilizing Powerblanket concrete blankets will ensure that concrete is kept at the correct temperature for the necessary reactions to happen quickly and the desired strength to be reached. With Powerblanket, it’s almost never too cold to pour concrete!

Temperature makes all the difference when pouring concrete. Check out our article on how temperature affects concrete that is still curing inside the Hoover Dam!

How long does concrete take to set?

If you really want to know the truth, concrete never stops curing; it continually hardens forever. However, for practical purposes, it reaches a point where further hardening will be so slow it becomes unnoticeable. In this article, we cover the basics of what you need to know if you’re asking the question, “how long does concrete take to set?”

Concrete Never Stops Curinghow long does it take concrete to set

The continual hardening occurs because cement particles react with the water in the mix (hydration), and as long as cement is in contact with moisture, even miniscule bubbles, it will continue to form bonds. This is minimal after “full strength” is achieved, but it is continual.

Curing Time for Concrete

In standard industrial cases, full strength concrete is recognized at 28 days. At seven days, you should have concrete that is cured to 70% full strength or greater. But to answer the question of, “How long does concrete take to set?” concrete setting time is generally 24 to 48 hours. At this point the neighborhood dog will not leave his footprints in it, but you should keep it clear of heavy equipment during this time period. Most mixes are cured at 28 days.

Factors Affecting Concrete Setting Time

  • Moisture's Effect on Concrete SettingMoisture plays a critical role in curing time for concrete. If there is not sufficient water in the mix, the concrete will cure too fast, resulting in weaker overall strength. Too much moisture, often used in the finishing step will weaken the top layer and cause flaking.
  • Hot ambient temperatures and wind accelerate the evaporation of moisture–speeding concrete setting time.
  • The mix design has a lot to do with concrete setting time. Some jobs will require accelerants because the area needs to be usable as soon as possible. The accelerant will do its job and speed up the concrete setting time. Accelerant mixes will show a weaker overall strength in the end, but will still meet strength requirements.

Temperature also has an impact on concrete setting time. For more information, check out this article about how concrete curing temperature makes a difference.

Concrete Blankets

If you are wondering about how long concrete takes to set, a solution for your concrete setting needs is a concrete heating or cooling blanket. But not all blankets are created equal. Consider the following two types of solutions to the effects of hot and cold:

The FluxWrap from North Slope Chillers is portable cooling equipment that will keep newly poured concrete safe from heat, regulating concrete setting time in both regular and hot conditions.

The FluxWrap is combined with either a cooler or chiller to achieve optimum results. The Circulation Blanket draws heat to the blanket in order to cool the concrete.

  • Use Powerblanket’s patented heat-spreading technology in reverse–the cooling blanket draws heat away and lowers the temperature of the concrete.
  • Take it with you on every jog.  It is easily portable.
  • Blanket cover and insulation are the same as the robust system used in Powerblanket heating products
  • Control the curing speed of newly poured concrete even in hot conditions

If conditions are cold, concrete curing blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete effectively and confidently. Powerblanket curing blankets increase production by rapidly curing with consistent, even heat.

  •  Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional, insulated blankets
  •  Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  •  Easily installed and removed
  •  Produce cold weather concreting strength of up to 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  •  Prevent a freeze cycle
  •  Thaw ground and frost from job site before you pour
  •  Reduce downtime & increase profitability
  •  Maintain ACI compliance for cold weather concreting

Realize that just because you have a concrete curing blanket doesn’t mean you have a solution. The type of blanket and how that blanket is used will have a massive impact on your concrete. Read more about curing blankets here.

Concrete Curing Temperature Makes a Difference

How Warm Does it Have To Be To Pour Concrete?

Whether the conditions are hot or freezing, the ideal concrete curing temperature should be maintained at about 55°F to achieve the optimum concrete strength.

Curing the Hoover Dam

At its completion in 1935, the Hoover Dam was the largest dam in the world and a marvel of labor and engineering.  The first pour began on June 6, 1933. Rather than being a single block of concrete, workers built the dam as a series of individual columns. The trapezoidal columns rose in five foot lifts. This method allowed the tremendous heat produced by the curing concrete to dissipate. If the dam were built in a single continuous pour, the concrete would have gotten so hot that it would have taken 125 years for the concrete to cool to ambient temperatures. The resulting stresses would have caused the dam to crack and crumble away.  

The heat and dryness of Nevada posed additional complex problems with the pour and concrete curing temperature.  When the concrete was first poured, river water circulated through cooling coils of 1″ thin-walled steel pipes. Once the concrete had received a first initial cooling, chilled water from a refrigeration plant on the lower cofferdam circulated through the coils to finish the cooling.

Concrete Curing is an Art

We live in a world where faster always seems better; however, concrete that cures too quickly or under hot concrete curing conditions can actually result in weak or unstable concrete.  If concrete is cured in cooler ambient  temperatures (32°F to 50°F) with moisture continually present, strength gain will be slow but the concrete will eventually reach a high strength. Concrete should not be allowed to get hotter than 90°F or to dry out during the curing period.

Best Concrete Curing Temperature

By “best” we mean “most thoroughly,” not the fastest.  High temperatures mean faster curing, but fast curing equates to weaker strength in the end.  The following study by Paul Klieger in the Portland Cement Association Research Bulletin 103 illustrates this concept.

concrete cure time chart with concrete curing temperature

Concrete Cure Time Chart with Temperature

At an age of 1 day the 120°F concrete was strongest and the 25°F concrete was weakest. By 7 days the high-temperature cured concretes had no more strength than the 73°F concrete or even less. By the age of 28 days the high-temperature concretes were weaker than the 73°F concrete. From 28 days to 1 year the 55°F concrete was considerably stronger than the 73°F concrete. All of this suggests that, provided there is continuous curing, concrete cured at about 55°F for the first 28 days ultimately reaches the highest strength (Concrete).

Hot Weather Concrete Temperature Limits

Hot weather concreting doesn’t simply involve temperature.  High ambient temperatures, winds, and relative humidity all play a role in “hot weather.”  Under hot heather conditions, the primary curing issue is having the top of the slab of concrete dry much faster than the bottom. As concrete dries it shrinks. This means that the top will be shrinking while the bottom is not. This creates internal problems with the concrete that will result in a damaged slab. The top and the bottom of the pour need to cure at the same rate (Placing).

Concrete Curing Temperature Solutions

Is it too HOT?

Powerblanket ICE is portable cooling equipment that will keep newly poured concrete safe from heat. Portable, insulated, and efficient, Powerblanket ICE effectively regulates the temperature of concrete under both regular and hot conditions.

The Powerblanket ICE Circulation Blanket is combined with either a cooler or chiller to achieve optimum results. The Circulation Blanket draws heat to the blanket in order to cool the concrete.

  • Use Powerblanket’s patented heat-spreading technology in reverse–the cooling blanket draws heat away and lowers the temperature of the concrete.
  • Blanket cover and insulation are the same as the robust system used in Powerblanket heating products
  • Portable
  • Control the curing speed of newly poured concrete even in hot conditions

Is it too COLD?

Can you pour and cure concrete in the winter? Powerblanket concrete curing blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete effectively and confidently in the cold weather months. Even in warm weather, Powerblanket curing blankets increase production by rapidly curing with consistent, even heat.

  •   Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional, insulated blankets
  •   Produce cold weather concreting strength of up to 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  •   Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  •   Easily installed and removed
  •   Prevent a freeze cycle
  •   Thaw ground and frost from job site prior to pour
  •   Reduce downtime & increase profitability
  •   Maintain ACI compliance for cold weather concreting

Powerblanket understands what it’s like to work on large concrete projects when the weather and temperatures aren’t cooperating. From the Statue of Liberty to a major interstate bridge in Kansas City, we’ve been a part of the action and have proven our products to be the best in the industry.

For more info on solutions, check out Powerblanket’s Concrete Curing Blankets and find one that fits your needs best.

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

“Placing Concrete in hot or cold weather”. Sakrete Blog. 16 May 2017. http://www.sakrete.com/media-center/blog-detail.cfm/bp_alias/Placing-Concrete-in-hot-or-cold-weather

“The Story of Hoover Dam – Essays”. Bureau of Reclamation. 16 May 2017. https://www.usbr.gov/lc/hooverdam/history/essays/concrete.html

Hot Weather Concreting Made Easier

Hot Weather ConcretingHot weather concreting

Hot weather concreting problems are most often encountered in the summer; however, any condition that increases curing rates and strips the concrete of moisture is considered hot weather concreting.

Pouring Concrete in Hot Weather

With temperatures rising and summer approaching, attentions shift from protecting concrete from the cold to concreting in hot conditions.  When pouring concrete in hot weather, special procedures should be followed for proper mixing, placing, finishing, and curing.  High ambient temperatures, high concrete temperatures, low relative humidity, and/or high winds impair the quality of freshly mixed and recently placed concrete (Hot).  Pouring concrete in hot weather affects laboratory test results, showing that higher temperatures affect the compressive strength gain of hardened concrete. Even though concrete poured in hot weather will produce higher early strength but as time goes by, the ultimate strength will be lower than expected (Rodriguez).

Water Loss

Hot weather concreting causes increased setting rates and rapid water loss.  Shrinkage and cracking are usually associated with hot windy weather.   The major side effect of faster curing and water loss is decreased overall concrete strength.  It is critical to prevent moisture from evaporating from the concrete surface. The evaporation rate removes surface water necessary for hydration , and thermal cracking may result from rapid changes in temperature, ie. pouring concrete on a hot day followed by a cool night (CIP 12). Proper mix design can compensate for these conditions, and in combination with protective measures to prevent rapid evaporation, quality concrete can be poured in hot temperatures (Rodriquez).

Adding water can increase concrete workability. However, adding water beyond the amount required by the approved mix design increases the water to cement ratio. This, in turn, can result in decreased compressive strength and an increased chance of cracking (Hot).

Recommendations for Hot Weather Concreting

Preparation is key and there are several basic precautions that can reduce the damaging effects of hot weather on concrete:

  • Use mix designs that are less susceptible to the effects of hot weather. The use of low-heat-of-hydration cement and certain admixtures (such as hydration retarding and/or water-reducing admixtures) are two standard approaches.
  • Keep concrete as cool as reasonably possible. ACI 305R does not state a maximum “as-placed” or “as-delivered” concrete temperature, but 90° F is commonly used. Substituting chilled water or shaved ice for a portion of the required mix water can help.
  • Limit the amount of time between loading the concrete at the plant and placement/finishing at the site.
  • Limit water addition at the job site, except to adjust slump upon arrival (when permitted by mix design).
  • Avoid or limit hydration accelerating admixture use.
  • Schedule large concrete pours in the early morning or evening when temperatures are cooler and have the manpower available to complete the job as quickly as possible.
  • Use temporary wind screens and water misting nozzles to reduce surface moisture loss (Hot).
  • Consider using a concrete cooling blanket to both retain moisture and protect the concrete’s surface from high ambient temperatures.

Powerblanket ICE Concrete Cooling

Powerblanket ICE® is portable cooling equipment that will keep newly poured concrete safe from heat.  Portable, insulated, and efficient, Powerblanket ICE effectively regulates the temperature of concrete under both regular and hot conditions.

The Powerblanket Ice Circulation Blanket is combined with either a cooler or chiller to achieve optimum results. The Circulation Blanket draws heat to the blanket while also cooling the concrete.

  • Blankets use Powerblanket’s patented heat-spreading technology in reverse–the cooling blanket draws heat away from the drum and lowers the temperature of the concrete.
  • Blanket cover and insulation are the same as the robust system used in the Powerblanket heating products
  • Powerblanket Ice industrial cooling systems are portable (120VAC required)
  • Control the curing speed of newly poured concrete even in hot conditions

 

Works Cited

“CIP 12 Hot Weather Concreting”. NRMCA. 5 May 2017. www.nrmca.org/aboutconcrete/cips/12pr.pdf

“Hot Weather Concrete”. Engineering Consulting Services.  5 May 2017. www.ecslimited.com/blog/hot-weather-concrete

Rodriguez, Juan. “Pouring Concrete in Hot Weather: Tips and Tricks”. The Balance.  5 May 2017. 

https://www.thebalancesmb.com/pouring-concrete-in-hot-weather-845030

 

Powerblanket Curing Blankets at the Statue of Liberty

Statue of LibertyReilly Construction out of Wrightstown, NJ, won a bid from the U. S. Department of the Interior to replace the roof of The Great Hall Statue of Liberty National Monument. The Great Hall, which now houses the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, is considered one of the most symbolically important structures in American history. The Great Hall-Ellis Island was proclaimed a part of Statue of Liberty National Monument and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Reilly needed extra heat in the form of curing blankets to make this job happen.

Challenges Faced by Reilly

  • Cold winter weather and high winds at this waterfront facility
  • Working safely around thousands of tourists visiting this historic landmark daily
  • Implementing various overhead protection plans at this historic landmark daily
  • Mobilizing materials and equipment on a small island
  • Limited laydown and staging areas
  • Coordinating construction schedule with NPS & U.S. Park Police for VIP visits
  • Ensuring compliance with the NYS Historic Preservation Office (SHPO)
  • Day & night work


Powerblanket to the Rescue

The project involved removal of the existing inverted roof membrane assembly (IRMA) and replacement with a new multi-ply modified bitumen roofing system over a complicated tapered insulation deck assembly, approx. 60,000 Sq. Ft. The project also included the replacement of custom fabricated copper flashings and accessories throughout and the installation of a lighting protection system. Reilly worked with the NYS Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) to coordinate all the work.

Dan DeSantis, the Senior Project Manager for Reilly, found Powerblanket products online and left his contact information. Upon follow up, we discovered that Reilly needed a heating solution to cure the masonry block work at the proper temperature (50°F/10°C) during December in New York and with the added chill of the water. Reilly used five Powerblanket MD0520 concrete curing blankets for the application, and appreciated the increased temperature control.

Powerblanket at the Statue of Liberty

A Cure for What Ails You

Powerblanket concrete curing blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete effectively and confidently in the cold weather months. Even in warm weather, Powerblanket curing blankets increase production by rapidly curing with consistent, even heat.

Why Choose Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets?

  • Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional, insulated blankets
  • Produce cold weather concreting strength of up to 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  • Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  • Easily installed and removed
  • Prevent a freeze cycle
  • Thaw ground and frost from job site prior to pour
  • Reduce downtime & increase profitability
  • Maintain ACI compliance for cold weather concreting

The Effects of Pouring Concrete in Cold Weather

concrete pouring temperature graphic
First, let’s define cold weather with respect to pouring concrete. Any time you have three consecutive days where the average daily temperature is less than 40°F, or if the temperature is lower than 50°F for less than half of any of the three days–that is undesirably cold for concrete. Pouring concrete in cold weather will have a detrimental affect on concrete curing for several reasons.

How Does Concrete Cure?

Concrete transforms from a liquid to a solid material through a chemical reaction. The speed of the reaction depends upon the temperature of the concrete. When the weather is warm, the reaction proceeds quickly. When it’s cold and the ground hasn’t been thawed, the reaction slows down. That’s the problem: the concrete needs to harden as rapidly as possible to resist pressures caused by water freezing within the concrete.

Slower Chemical Reactions

If the temperature is too cold, the concrete may not have reached a minimum strength of 500 psi soon enough to resist the effects of freezing temperatures. If your concrete isn’t protected with concrete curing blankets after it’s poured, it may cool too rapidly, slowing the chemical reaction.

Poor finishing techniques can also doom your slabs. Freshly poured concrete often bleeds. The water in the mix floats to the top, since it’s the lightest ingredient. Floating or troweling this water into the concrete weakens the top layer. Troweling the concrete too early can seal this bleed water just below the surface as well. If your slab is then exposed to freezing temperatures several days later, this water can freeze and fracture the top layer. Using a concrete curing blanket can eliminate the potential of freezing.

Read how Powerblanket solved concrete issues at the Statue of Liberty.

Concrete Can Be Successfully Poured in Cold Weatherpouring a concrete foundation at a jobsite

How to avoid a bad concrete pour:

  • Never pour concrete on frozen ground, snow, or ice. 
  • Be sure to order air-entrained concrete. Request a heated mix or order 100 lbs of extra cement for each cubic yard of concrete. This extra cement helps develop early strength.
  • Be sure the concrete is ordered with a low slump (drier mix). This minimizes bleed water.
  • After the final finish is completed, cover the concrete with a concrete curing blanket. The heated concrete blanket will prevent freezing and keep the concrete at an optimal curing temperature.
  • After about three days, remove heated concrete blankets to allow the concrete to air dry.

Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets

If you use Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets to pour in cold weather, your cement will cure 2.8 times faster than with conventional insulated blankets. Time and convenience are critical factors when planning out a project in the winter, and Powerblanket has you covered.  Our goal is to provide solutions to problems, and give you total temperature control over every process and aspect of your business.

We Solve Problems

From drum and barrel heaters to pipe wraps and snow melting mats, Powerblanket is dedicated to helping your business grow, saving jobs, and improving your bottom line.   Whether you need to extend the pouring season, or you are trying to survive an early winter, know that you have total temperature control with Powerblanket.

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5 Helpful Tips for Winter Construction Efficiency

5 Tips for Winter Construction

Working outside during the cold winter months presents many obstacles; however, some jobs will not wait for better circumstances. Below are some tips and solutions to improve winter construction.

1) KEEP YOUR EMPLOYEES SAFE

Train your employees in proper winter construction precautions.  Encourage everyone to wear layers of loose-fitting clothing, to stay dry, and to protect from the wind and sun with gloves, hats and sunscreen.  If conditions become too cold/dangerous, employees should have access to shelter.

On the work site, remove ice and snow regularly to prevent slips and falls.  This can be a full-time job depending on the weather.  The act of shoveling snow can also be extremely strenuous, especially for those individuals who do not engage in regular cardiovascular activity. According to the Cleveland Clinic, approximately 11,000 people seek shoveling-related hospital treatment each year for injuries (93%) or cardiac issues (7%). To save time, energy, and your employees health, use Summerstep heated safety mats to keep the walkways on your construction site clear.

Summerstep Snow Melting Mats

  • ,  Protect personnel from winter weather conditions and keep stairs, doorways, walkways, and ramps free from snow and ice
  •   Prevent slips and falls
  •   More convenient than shoveling snow
  •   More effective for snow and ice melting than harsh chemicals (less damaging to the environment, reusable, won’t damage concrete or other flooring surfaces)
  •   Will melt approximately 2 inches of snow per hour when operating
  •   40 Watts/Sq ft heated area
  •   The ONLY snow melting mat product made in the USA

 

2) MAINTAIN INTEGRITY OF CONCRETE

Winter construction cold-weather operations aren’t just about safety. While most construction tasks can be carried out in cold weather, some operations, such as concrete work, can take much longer and even fail without proper precautions.

 

If concrete is to reach necessary strength levels, it can’t be allowed to freeze for the first 24 hours after being poured or placed. Sheeting the concrete can ensure the required temperature and moisture necessary for curing, if the weather isn’t too severe.  In severe conditions, supplemental heating systems or enclosures must be brought in to maintain the integrity of the concrete.

 

Powerblanket Concrete Blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete in the cold weather months, save you time and money, and come in various lengths and sizes. We have you covered.

 

Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets

  •   Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional insulated blankets
  •   Produce cold weather concreting strength of 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  •   Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  •   Easily installed and removed
  •   Maintain ACI compliance for cold-weather concreting  Certified to UL and CSA standards

 

3) DON’T LET FROZEN GROUND SLOW YOU DOWN

When it’s cold and the ground freezes, the job suffers.  Often prep for winter construction takes longer than the actual job.  Some industrial companies try heating the ground with massive coils or large heating systems, which become expensive and cumbersome. This approach requires rental fees and transporting equipment.  

Powerblanket has considered the difficulties and delays associated with winter construction and cold/freezing temperatures and has created a solution.  With Powerblanket’s patented heating technology you can prep the ground with little to no effort or supervision on your part.

Powerblanket ground thawing blankets have a higher power density and hotter temperature than our concrete curing blankets. The higher power is iideal for ground thawing applications and curing epoxy or resins.

Why Powerblanket Ground Thawing Blankets?

  •   High power density thaws frozen ground quickly
  •   Remove frost prior to concrete pour
  •   Melt snow and ice from roofs, walkways, and construction areas
  •   Easily placed and removed for repeated use in harsh winter weather
  •   Can be used to cure epoxy and resins
  •   Certified to UL and CSA standards

 

4) KEEP MATERIALS WARM

Masonry, roofing, paint, and plaster/stucco materials are all sensitive to cold weather.  Maintaining the integrity of these materials is critical for their success in winter construction.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes save you money by keeping your products from freezing without the risk of overheating. The Hot Box pallet warmer is easily assembled, taken apart. Hot boxes are ideal for cold wea
ther storage, freeze protection, transporting, job site heating, remote location use, and winter roofing. Standard Hot Boxes hold product between 100°F and 120°F (38°C and 49°C) and optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be precisely controlled.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes:

  •   Quick and easy assembly
  •   Preserve temperature sensitive material
  •   Heat materials and palletized products: adhesives, shingles, paint, caulk, resins epoxies, etc.
  •   Access doors on two sides.
  •   Certified to UL and CSA standards

 

5) USING A PROPANE HEATER

Winter construction professionals often use temporary, propane-powered heating equipment on the jobsite, making it easier to finish projects on time and on budget. In addition to providing more comfortable working conditions, propane-powered heaters can also maintain the ambient temperatures necessary for common tasks like drywall installation or painting. However, like any portable heating device, propane-powered heaters must be used and maintained properly.

When temperatures get too low, the propane will not flow consistently or effectively, and you may lose your heat altogether. Propane-tank efficiency will fall substantially as the temperature drops. As the temperature drops, so does the pressure in your propane tank, and the pressure in your propane tank directly affects the volume of propane you have to work with. Your extraction rate (how quickly and smoothly you can extract propane from the tank) will suffer as well. Without a heating source to assist in the pressure maintenance of your tank, you will have to keep it as full as possible in order to keep it working, even if temperatures are mildly cold.

Powerblanket Propane Tank Heater

Powerblanket has the best propane tank heating solution on the market. These heating blankets will help maintain pressure and efficiency on just about any size tank. All Powerblanket heating blankets are certified to UL and CSA safety standards

Benefits of Powerblanket Propane Tank Heaters:

  •   Increase performance and efficiency of propane tanks
  •   Eliminates unnecessary cylinder refills in cold weather
  •  Even heat distribution in the areas where it is needed most
  •   Save money by optimizing gas and material usage
  •    Certified to UL and CSA standards

 

 

Concrete Cooling: Curing Concrete in the Summer Months

We talk a lot about the dilemmas posed to concrete curing during the cold winter months, and for good reason too. It’s difficult to get concrete to cure well when the temperature drops. But what about when the weather is hot? True, fewer problems exist for concrete curing during the summer, but excessively hot temperatures can cause concrete to cure too quickly. Don’t worry; we’ve got you covered here too, with our concrete cooling.

egg frying on hot concreteConcreting in the Summer

We all know that summer is the ideal time for construction projects, and concrete pouring is no exception. But when the summer months get really hot, it can be a little too much of a good thing. In fact, concrete cures best in a range somewhere between 70° to 80° F. As you approach numbers as high as 90°, however, you’ll start to run into problems. Concrete experts suggest that if you anticipate experiencing temperatures higher than 77° F after pouring your concrete, you should have a plan for remedying the effects of the high temperatures. Since temperatures above 77° F are very common in the summer months, you’ll need to have a concrete cooling solution in place.

Why, you may ask? Because when concrete is poured in high temperatures, it can cure too fast. One of the major concerns with really short curing times is the reduction of strength due to the demand for high water content during high curing temperatures. Pouring concrete in hot weather also poses the risk of dehydrating the concrete, which will lead to shrinkage and cracking. With these risks in mind, it becomes imperative to have a plan in place for combating the hot weather, and we have just the solution for it too.

Powerblanket® ICE for Concrete Cooling

Our new Powerblanket ICE cooling blankets allow you to simplify the concrete work you do in the summer by eliminating the side-effects associated with hot weather concreting. Just look at these features:

  • Powerblanket ICE uses Powerblanket’s patented heat spreading technology in reverse to draw heat away from the concrete while simultaneously circulating coolant throughout the blanket surface.
  • All three types of Powerblanket ICE cooling products are portable. (Both the ice box and chiller driven systems require 120VAC). See the Powerblanket ICE cooling product pages on our website for details.
  • We can provide Powerblanket ICE cooling products for custom applications quickly and cost effectively, just like our heating products. Just get us the details, and we can have a product in your hands in just a few weeks.
  • Powerblanket ICE prevents shrinkage and cracking by maintaining the ideal curing temperature during hot weather.

Don’t take a chance with the hot weather this summer. Reach out to us today for a quote on Powerblanket ICE products.

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Powerblanket® Hot Box and Curing Blankets for Post Curing


When it comes to post curing, maintaining ideal temperature is a must. And if you’re post curing small to medium sized parts, then you may find yourself using expensive ovens, or else taking a whole lot of time and money to build your own. Thankfully, you don’t need to do either of these with the Powerblanket Hot Box on hand.

 

Powerblanket Hot Boxes/Bulk Material WarmersThe Powerblanket Hot Box

Our Hot Box product (sometimes referred to as a Bulk Material Warmer) works great at maintaining the needed temperature for post curing small to medium sized parts. Its durable construction allows for secure and lasting installation, while its ease of setup makes it transportable and storable. The Powerblanket Hot Box can be easily assembled, disassembled, and reassembled. It gives you the option of bringing your parts to the Hot Box or bringing the Hot Box to your parts. Our Hot Boxes hold product at a temperature of up to 120° F, and the optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be controlled with precision.
So if you need to keep your epoxy cures at temperature for prolonged periods of time, a Powerblanket Hot Box just might be the thing for you.

 

Powerblanket Hot Box pallet warmerOur Premium Hot Box (HB64PRO-1440) Offers:

  • A larger footprint (48” x 48”)
  • An internal steel frame (48” internal height)
  • The highest wattage (1440 Watts)
  • A controller for precise temperature regulation

 


heated curing blanketsPost Curing with Powerblanket Curing Blankets

Of course, after talking about the Hot Box, you may be thinking: “yeah, but what if what I need to cure is bigger than 48” x 48”? Well, there are two simple answers to this question. Depending on your application needs, we could build a custom size Hot Box for you. But if one of our flat curing blankets would work better, we would certainly suggest this as an option.

If you have curing needs that go well beyond what our Hot Boxes can handle, in regard to size and temperature, then our curing blankets are the ideal answer. Our high-temp flat blankets have high watt densities and produce higher temperatures for post curing epoxies and resins that require ranges beyond 100° F – 120° F, up to 400°F.  What’s more, these blankets can be made to cover large areas simply and effectively. So whether it’s carbon fiber construction, wind blade repair, floor coatings, or some other resin post curing application, Powerblanket has a solution for it.

 

 

Concrete Blankets From Powerblanket®

Cement Curing Blankets

Cement curing has always been a challenge in cold weather. Historically, experts have employed many different methods in order to aid in and speed up the curing process. Some methods are better than others. The best, in our opinion, is using concrete curing blankets from Powerblanket. Here’s why:

Concrete Curing Blankets

 

Why Electric Curing Blankets?

When placing concrete in cold weather, protecting the asset (the concrete) is not optional. For years now, experts have used insulated blankets to both protect the concrete and speed the curing process at the same time. Concrete cures due to a chemical reaction that generates heat as a byproduct. So insulating the concrete allows that heat to be trapped and used to aid in the curing process. Concrete cures fastest in very warm conditions, so this makes the use of an insulated blanket a practical and theoretically sound practice.

Of course, the use of traditional concrete curing blankets isn’t the only method employed among professionals. Other common curing interventions include:

  • Chemical additives
  • Hydronic heating systems
  • Electrically-powered concrete curing blankets
  • Poly/tarp cover with forced air heat applied

Sometimes the circumstance will allow for the luxury of a postponed pour, in order to take advantage of an expected temperature change.  But more often than not, schedules and deadlines make it imperative to institute curing assistance to get through less-than-favorable weather.

This is where Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets come in. As much as traditional curing blankets aid in protecting and accelerating the curing process, Powerblanket curing blankets provide both insulation and heat, protecting and accelerating all the more. Our patented blend of technology delivers an even distribution of electrical heat to the surface area of the blanket, trapping the heat of the chemical reaction in the concrete and adding the additional heat needed to accelerate the process even further.

Since Powerblanket Cement Curing Blankets insulate and heat, they effectively accommodate the hydration of the concrete as well. How well do they really work? Take a look at our case study to see an example of curing nearly three times as fast with our blankets.

The technology behind Powerblanket curing blankets serves to achieve several primary objectives, including:

  1. Preventing damage as a result of freezing in the early stage of curing
  2. Producing sufficient, specified strengths in a timely manner
  3. Insuring durability and long-term structural integrity
  4. Keeping projects on schedule, regardless of weather

So before you’re faced with a project that must go on despite inclement temperatures, make sure you have a plan on how to protect your concrete and keep your deadlines met. When considering the options you have before you, we’re confident you’ll find our solution to be the best answer out there.

 

Read the Case Study for Evidence that Powerblanket Cement Curing Blankets:

  • Cured concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional insulated blankets
  • Cured concrete 1.7 times faster without adding additional heat (un-powered)
  • Produced cold weather concreting strength of 3,925 psi in 72 hours

 

Additional Features:

  • Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  • Maintain ACI compliance for cold-weather concreting

 

 

Custom Heating Solutions Don’t Take as Long as You Think

Custom Heating Blankets from PowerblanketOften times when we think of customization, or taking a custom approach to something, the first thing that comes to mind is time. “How long is that going to take?” we ask ourselves. Well, in the case of Powerblanket custom heating solutions, not too long at all. Our custom approach to heating solutions doesn’t take as long as you might think. In fact, in most cases, Powerblanket can turn around a custom project in one to two weeks.

 

Custom is the Way to Go

Many applications can be adequately covered by our ready-to-ship product line, but there are equally as many projects that need a custom solution. Powerblanket works with many companies in a myriad of industries to supply custom heating solutions to a wide range of needs. So what does a custom heating solution process look like when working with us? We’ll show you.

Powerblanket’s custom heating solutions can be tailored to fit just about any application. If you can build it, produce it, or store it, Powerblanket can cover it. What’s more, completing a custom project with us can be summarized in three easy steps:

 

  1. Contact us and tell us the details of your application. (Many of our custom projects start with a simple phone call to one of our reps. From here, you can send any and all information we’ll need to form the proper heating solution for you. Additionally, we do offer what we refer to as the white glove treatment. In other words, we can come onsite and get all the details on our own.)
  2. We’ll design a custom heating solution for your application, based on the information and feedback we gather or you deliver to us. (Whether you choose to send us information or want us to come onsite, we will get all the details we need.)
  3. We’ll build your custom solution and ship it to you within two weeks. (Sometimes, we can even turn a project around in as little as one week.)

 

Case In Point

When Enduraplas’s plastics manufacturing process needed heating assistance, Powerblanket was able to deliver a custom tank heater that increased efficiency beyond expectations. Enduraplas’s manufacturing process uses propane extensively—making their large propane tanks an invaluable asset. However, cold weather threw a real damper on the whole thing, impeding the flow of propane significantly.
With the Poweblanket custom heating solution in place, however, Enduraplas was able to run their manufacturing processes through the coldest of weather.

 

Gold Coast Yachts is another great example of how Powerblanket custom heating saved immense amounts of time and money. Gold Coast Yachts builds custom, carbon-fiber yachts, and the curing process for the large sections of carbon-fiber frames needs high-temperature exposure for long periods of time. Previous to implementing the Powerblanket custom curing blankets, Gold Coast had to architect, build, and utilize large custom ovens for every cure. In other words, they had to build a large shed around every frame in order to pipe heat into the enclosure and cure the resins at the proper temperature. This process, as you can imagine, took a whole lot of time, manpower, and money. With Powerblanket, however, Gold Coast Yachts was able to save thousands of dollars and hours of time on each project.

 

When Cenovus turned to Powerblanket to design a custom valve and transmitter heating solution, Powerblanket was able to turn the product around with ease and speed. Powerblanket set out to create a custom heating system that eliminated the risk Cenovus had of losing money to freezing valves and transmitters. After Powerblanket completed the project, Cenovous no longer had to worry about the cost associated with downtime and the thawing of frozen instrumentation and valves.

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Precast Concrete and Throughput: How to Improve Cure Times

The business of precast concrete manufacturing is one where you often have to hurry up and wait. Once you pour a precast form, you then have to wait for the time-consuming process of allowing the form to fully cure. The importance of proper curing can’t be undermined, but what if it could be efficiently and safely sped up?

 

Cure Precast Concrete 3 Times as Fast

What if we told you that you could speed up your precast concrete curing process, without the use of any additives, by as much as 300%? If you’re first thought is: prove it, then we would love to. In fact, it may interest you to know that the inception of Powerblanket heating solutions all started with concrete curing in the first place. We’ve been in the business of increasing concrete-curing efficiency for many years, and our solutions have been proven and tested innumerable times over to increase curing efficiency without any of the common side effects related to other forms of acceleration.

Additives can dehydrate your concrete and leave you playing a game of gains and losses. But Powerblanket custom precast concrete curing solutions keep your concrete insulated and hydrated throughout the curing process. Our patented blend of technology allows for the even and consistent curing of precast forms of all shapes and sizes.

So rather than balancing the pros and cons of using additives or accelerators in your concrete forms, let us show you a solution that creates no setbacks, only progress. To learn more about our precast curing blankets, select the button below for the infographic.

Powerblanket Receives Manufacturer of the Year Award from UMA

If you haven’t seen this headline somewhere else on the web by now, we’re happy to tell you all about it here. Utah Manufacturers Association recently awarded Powerblanket something we’re pretty happy about. Read on to learn more about the UMA Manufacturer of the Year Award.

 

Brent Reddekopp  receiving UMA Award for PowerblanketUMA and Manufacturer of the Year

Utah Manufacturers Association (UMA), recently awarded Powerblanket the prestigious award  of Manufacturer of the Year. This award is given annually to the Utah-based manufacturer that proves to be the most innovative contributor to their space. There’s even more to it than this, but we’ll get to that.

UMA has been around since 1905. The organization prides itself on offering the “voice of industry” in the state of Utah, and they’ve been doing so for over 107 years now. UMA has clearly been talking Utah economy for a long time, but talking isn’t all they do. UMA is a trade association, and their goal is to enhance and improve the business climate in the state. UMA doesn’t only offer insight and expertise in the business of manufacturing, but the organization also has considerable experience in the legislative processes of state government. This is how they can do so much to vie for the interests of Utah businesses and the overall economic prosperity of the state.

UMA’s Manufacturer of the Year Award embodies the mission of UMA in multiple ways. By awarding the company that not only proves innovative in their respective markets, but also offers leadership in their industry, UMA’s award encourages and rewards the same idealism by which their organization operates. Powerblanket was chosen to receive this award for 2015, based on the embodiment of these characteristics and more. In fact, why don’t we just give it to you in their own words. According to UMA, Powerblanket received the award “for their outstanding performance in operational excellence, economic achievement, workplace safety, community outreach, and fidelity to the principles of free enterprise.”

Powerblanket is honored to receive such accolades from a high quality establishment like UMA. The credibility of UMA and the Manufacturer of the Year Award lends a great addition to our own image and ethos as a company devoted to “operational excellence, economic achievement, workplace safety, community outreach, and fidelity to the principles of free enterprise.”

So, from all of us here at Powerblanket, thank you, UMA for this great privilege.

 

Precast Concrete and Powerblanket: A 300% Increase in Efficiency

If you’re in the business of precast concrete, then you know how frustrating it is to have to pour once a day. When it comes to precast production, the curing time for concrete simply isn’t very conducive to a good production turnaround. But what if you could increase your cure rate by 300%? Well, read on, because you can.

 

Precast concrete manholeConcrete and Powerblanket

The inception of Powerblanket over one decade ago actually spawned from the use of certain technologies (our innovative approach to heating solutions) in order to cure concrete faster and more efficiently. The idea for accelerated concrete curing was no new idea. Chemical admixtures were used to increase the cure time of concrete before Powerblanket came along to change the game. But the problem with chemical additives is that they dehydrate the concrete as they speed up the curing process. And as any concrete expert knows, that’s a big problem.

The Powerblanket solution, on the other hand, keeps the moisture in the concrete while producing insulation, protection, and heat—all of which increase the curing efficiency by 300%. That’s right, and in the case of pouring concrete into forms, well, such an increase makes a real difference. Adding customized Powerblanket heating solutions to your precast concrete business means that you can increase your throughput substantially. If you’re pouring only once a day, adding a Powerblanket solution to your process means you’ll be able to pour three times a day.

And the beauty of Powerblanket heating solutions is that they’re easy to install, remove, transport, and store. So when a form of concrete is cured, you can remove the blanket quicker than the form itself. Additionally, Powerblanket heating solutions can be customized to fit just about anything. So if you use unique precast forms, there’s no need to fret. To put it simply: if you can build it, produce it, or store it, Powerblanket can cover it.

 

 

Concrete Curing: Not Just a Wintertime Problem

If you’re in the business of concrete, then you know that winter poses the most complications when it comes to proper concrete curing. However, you’ll be equally aware of the fact that summertime also has its challenges.

 

Finishing concrete sidewalk

Summertime Concreting

Sure, winter is a far more difficult time to deal with when pouring concrete. Proper curing involves ideal temperatures, and winter imposes on these ranges more than any other season. That’s why when it comes to pouring concrete in winter, you need the assistance of a good concrete curing blanket. But what can be done to counter the challenges of summer, and what are those primary challenges?

In the summer months, you don’t have to worry about freezing temperatures. Instead, you need to watch for levels of relative humidity, temperature fluctuations between night and day hours, and an increase in the water demand for concrete curing. With these factors to consider, careful monitoring of the concrete is still an important element of the job. Hotter temperature and low humidity can increase the need for additional water, and large fluctuations between the daytime and evening temperature can pose significant problems too.

If there is the risk of a rapid drop in temperature, then there is the risk that your concrete could crack. Even though the temperature may be ideal for curing during the day, that doesn’t mean it will be at night. Certain regions can experience significant temperature variances between daytime and evening hours, and these variances should be considered potentially problematic while your concrete cures.

 

Using a Concrete Curing Blanket in the Summer?

It may seem a bit of a stretch to suggest the use of a curing blanket during the summer months, but the reality of the situation is that it can be a very reasonable call. Think about the potential scenario of dropping temperatures at night. If your concrete is curing well during the heat of the day, and then experiences a drastic drop in temperature at night, then it’s going to affect the cure and even cause potential cracking.

Using a concrete curing blanket at night would allow you to regulate the temperature range even if it’s dropping. This would produce a more uniform cure and would also speed up the process significantly. The blanket likely wouldn’t be needed during the day, but applying it at night could greatly decrease the fail rate of an expensive and time consuming project.

Winter Preparation: Now’s the Time

As the temperatures around the nation rise into the hundreds, cold-weather preparation may be the furthest thing from your mind. What’s more, there are plenty of warm-weather applications that Powerblanket technology is used for. But we would be completely remiss if we didn’t say enough of proper winter preparation. After all, when it comes to preparing for winter, you don’t want to be a grasshopper…

Aesop’s Fable: The Ant and the Grasshopper

Perhaps you’re already familiar with the old fable of The Ant and the Grasshopper from Aesop. If you’re not (and even if you are) we’ve recited it here. Below follows the most popular English renditions of the story:

“In a field one summer’s day a Grasshopper was hopping about, chirping and singing to its heart’s content. An Ant passed by, bearing along with great toil an ear of corn he was taking to the nest.

‘Why not come and chat with me,’ said the Grasshopper, ‘instead of toiling and moiling in that way?’

‘I am helping to lay up food for the winter,’ said the Ant, ‘and recommend you to do the same.’

‘Why bother about winter?’ said the Grasshopper; we have got plenty of food at present.’ But the Ant went on its way and continued its toil.

When the winter came, the Grasshopper found itself dying of hunger, while it saw the ants distributing, every day, corn and grain from the stores they had collected in the summer. Then the Grasshopper knew it is best to prepare for the days of necessity.”

Of course, the implications of this story can go far deeper than the need for good winter preparation. But for the sake of comparison, the story’s plot is rather poignant for the industries we serve. When cold weather does hit, it’s best to already have the systems and products you need in place to brave the effects of winter. So if you have assets to cover come late October, now’s the best time to start getting together the protection you’ll need.

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Epoxy Curing For Boats and Other Water Craft

To many people, summer means time on the lake or in the ocean boating or jet skiing. But have you ever stopped to consider how boats and other water craft are built? In almost every case, the high-tech water vessels of today use some form of fiber construction and epoxy curing.

 

Boats at the dock

Epoxy Construction on Water Vessels

Not everyone stops to think about how their jet ski was built when their speeding across the lake at 40 mph. Nor do many think about the same sort of thing as they’re sitting in their finely crafted boat, fishing or watching friends or family water ski. But such a thought is certainly worth addressing, even if it’s long before or after all the fun is over.

Unless you’re out enjoying the water in an older, traditional wooden or aluminum boat, you’re likely sitting in a piece of modern engineering, the type that involves high-quality plastics, glass fibers (sometimes referred to as glass-reinforced plastics – aka: fiberglass) and on some occasion, even carbon fiber. Most boats and jet skis these days are built using such composite materials. And where such composites as these exist, there’s also the need for some heavy-duty resins.

Composites such as fiberglass and carbon fiber are bound together using high-grade epoxy resins. These resins both bind and coat the material in a hard, nearly impervious shell—making for very strong construction. For those familiar with epoxy curing, it’s apparent that the primary challenge is temperature. Most epoxies cure well above room temperature, and when you’re dealing with construction as big as boats, such an endeavor becomes all the more difficult.

Some boat manufacturers take a lot of time and resources to construct large ovens or rooms in which they can pump heated air in order to bring the temperature up to the ideal range for epoxy curing. As you can imagine, such an undertaking requires a lot of patients, not to mention it creates a lot of downtime.

This is why Powerblanket is pleased to offer the boat-manufacturing world a much better solution. With Powerblanket curing blankets, a manufacturer can saves thousands of dollars and hours of time just on one boat build. Our curing blankets allow epoxy to cure at its ideal temperature for as long as needed. What’s more, Powerblanket curing blankets are available in ready-to-ship and customizable sizes and shapes.

 

 

Curing Epoxy Resin On Wind Turbine Blades

Whether it’s for repair or initial construction, curing epoxy resin on wind turbine blades can be a tricky endeavor. However, with the right technology, this arduous process can be a whole lot easier.

 

Wind turbine blade on the ground

Wind Turbines: A Large Scale Application

The typical wind turbine blade ranges in length from 116 ft. to as much as 148 ft. That accounts for a big hunk of glass-fiber or carbon-fiber reinforced plastic. Either way you look at it, the curing process involved with such a beast is certain to take a lot of space. That’s why wind turbines are often created in pieces and then secured by joints.

Very strong, high-temperature epoxies are used for this process, but as anyone who’s worked with epoxy knows, the proper curing takes some extra heat. Can you imagine building a hot box around the joint of a turbine blade? Better yet, can you imagine having to stick that huge thing in an oven? The idea sounds ludicrous, and it is when you consider that there is a much better way of approaching the problem.

Instead of being left to the need of a hot box or an oven to properly heat cure epoxy resin on wind turbines, you could apply localized heat to the area that needs to be cured. That’s right, localized heat in the form of a revolutionary heat blanket that evenly distributes heat over the entire surface area of application. In addition to the amazing ability this blanket has of transferring heat, it also has the capability to regulate it.

By using thermostatic controllers, you can use such a blanket to cure epoxy at the ideal temperature. It’s simply a matter of setting the temperature range to the proper level for your application and then waiting for it to work its magic. With customization possibilities, this blanket is available in as many sizes as necessary, so you can cure even the largest cure joint. Shoot, you could even cure the whole blade if you want.

 

 

Powerblanket at the World of Concrete—A Demo in Concrete Curing

Earlier this month, Powerblanket attended the 2015 edition of the World of Concrete at the Las Vegas Convention Center. This year’s exhibition attracted 55,779 registered professionals. In addition, the event drew in 1,459 companies exhibiting their products and services. For Powerblanket and its concrete curing demo, the event proved to be a great way to engage with those in need of the company’s products.

 

 

Powerblanket and the World of Concrete

For Powerblanket, this year’s World of Concrete was an exciting investment of company time and resources. Powerblanket ran a concrete curing demo to demonstrate the effectiveness of Powerblanket® curing blankets on the set times and structural integrity of concrete pours. Those who were present were able to witness for themselves how much efficiency the curing blankets added to the curing process. Not only were the blankets able to cure the concrete nearly three times as fast, but they were also able to increase the strength of the concrete by 50%.

The slab used for the demonstration was 8” thick with a mix design that was formulated to provide a minimal PSI of 4,000 in only two days.  The slab was poured two days prior to the demonstration, and for the purposes of the demonstration, one portion remained unheated while the other section was covered in an MD series Powerblanket® curing blanket. At the beginning of the demonstration, the unheated portion of the concrete measured close to the 4,000 PSI that was required for the minimal target. Then the Powerblanket was added, and the portion of the slab that was heated by the Powerblanket MD Series concrete curing blanket measured a consistent 6,000 PSI after only 16 hours in place. That’s a PSI strength increase of 50% over the unheated portion of the concrete slab.

Powerblanket® curing blankets allow for such efficiency through the company’s patented technological approach to concrete curing and many other heating solutions. Not only do Powerblanket® curing blankets insulate the chemical reactions responsible for concrete heat exchange, but they also add heat to the equation—making them far more efficient than the common curing blanket.  Through the Powerblanket design, electrical heat is evenly distributed through the entire application, allowing for quicker set times and stronger concrete.

“Seeing people’s reactions to the demonstration was exciting,” said Ryan Jensen, Marketing Director for Powerblanket. “It was clear that everyone was impressed with the outcome.”

As a result, Powerblanket has engaged with more customers in an industry they already heavily serve.

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A Concrete Curing Solution

If you live in the North American Mountain West, or any region where it gets cold during the winter months, chances are you’ve seen chipping concrete. Have you ever stopped to think what causes concrete to chip? Improper curing is what causes it, but with a good concrete curing blanket, this problem can be completely avoided.

 

Freshly finished concrete sidewalk

Not All Concrete Curing Blankets Are The Same

If you’ve ever seen chipped concrete before, it’s likely due to cold weather. But we’re not talking about cold weather after the pour. No, chipping concrete often results from it being poured when it was too cold. This means the concrete never fully cured. Thus, it became brittle and flaky. The simple solution to this dilemma is either to wait until its warm enough outside, or else apply a concrete curing blanket.

If you did a Google search for concrete curing blankets, you’re likely to find a myriad of options. But not all these options are the same. A good majority of the curing blankets out there are merely insulation blankets. Now insulation is a good thing to have in a curing solution, but it’s only half of the equation. The problem with simply insulating the concrete is twofold.

If you have a concrete blanket that only acts as an insulator then it’s not likely to help in the extreme weather. This is the first problem with an insulation blanket. The second is this: with only insulation on your side, you’re not going to be speeding up the curing process at all. When concrete cures, a chemical reaction occurs. This reaction causes the concrete to put off heat. With this in mind, placing an insulated blanket over the concrete will help to keep some of this heat in, but the amount of heat it will trap isn’t substantial enough to help cure concrete in really cold weather, or to speed up the curing process much either.

Heated blankets to cure concrete

The Real Solution is Electric

This is why you need an electric curing blanket, or a heated curing blanket, to get the job done right. Electric curing blankets will both insulate and heat the concrete to an ideal temperature for curing. With the characteristics of a heated blanket at play, you can properly cure concrete in very cold temperatures. What’s more, even if the weather isn’t that bad, you can apply such a solution to speed up the curing process by leaps and bounds.

When it comes to picking the best electric curing blanket, there are a few major aspects to be concerned with.

  • Number one, you want to make sure you get a blanket that will evenly distribute the heat throughout the entire application area. If the blanket is hotter in some places than others, you’re not going to get an even cure.
  • Number two, you want to make sure you get a product that is properly certified for safety and efficiency. And number three, you want to make certain you purchase a blanket that can regulate its own heat. A blanket with a thermostatic controller will enable you to apply the heat and walk away without worrying whether it will keep consistent heat for the whole time you’re curing.

Check out Powerblanket’s Concrete Curing Blankets and find one that fits your needs best.

 

The Wonders of Concrete: From Creativity to Concrete Curing

When most people think about concrete, their minds quickly turn to the common, grey, lifeless slabs that we walk and drive on. You can’t fault anyone for envisioning concrete in this way, but is it really a fair representation of such a versatile and varied construction material? We don’t think so. From creativity to curing, concrete is a truly amazing product.

 

The Wonders of Concrete- From Creativity to Concrete Curing 1

Concrete’s Real Potential

If you’re one of the individuals whose thoughts turn to sidewalks, interstates, overpasses, and patios when you hear the word concrete, well, it’s really to be expected. These forms of concrete application are certainly the most common. But there are also many other common uses that the typical person may not been clued in to.

Instead of settling on the usual image of concrete, take a chance to expand your horizon. Have you ever stopped to think about the many different types of pavement that exist? The fact of the matter is that much of the pavement you’ve seen, both indoor and outdoor, is some form of concrete. You see, concrete has possibilities for design that many people never even stop to consider.

 

The Wonders of Concrete- From Creativity to Concrete Curing 2

Decorative Concrete

For those in the know, concrete that falls outside of the stereotypical application and image is known as decorative concrete. And what some people have been able to do with decorative concrete is simply amazing.

Take for example the patterns that skilled concrete layers have been able to weave into what would otherwise be a very boring driveway. Perhaps you’ve seen the same techniques employed in outdoor walkways in and around historic downtown districts, malls, or river walks. Think of the innumerable possibilities that exist with such a method. Think of this, and you’ve only scratched the surface, though.

Even with as many outdoor uses concrete has, there are just as many indoor application methods. In fact, these types are the most stunning. Take a look at the picture below the driveway. Looks like tile; doesn’t it? Nope, it’s concrete, decorative concrete that has been designed to look like a very impressive tile pattern. Now take a look at the image below that. Looks like laminate wood flooring; doesn’t it? Actually, it’s concrete too.

This sort of thing is quite the surprise; isn’t it? For those who first venture into the realm of decorative concrete, the possibilities at first seem almost unbelievable. Oh, but they’re a very real and valuable way to make expanded use of one of the world’s most common construction products. To find more great examples of concrete usage, just type into Google: “decorative concrete” (under an images search).

 

Powerblanket and Concrete

If you’re in the concrete business, then you know how much freezing temperatures are an enemy to concrete curing. Well, whether you’re pouring concrete to create the usual, grey slab of strong and reliable stuff or your working concrete into a work of art, Powerblanket has you covered.

With Powerblanket® Concrete Curing Blankets, you can ensure the proper and ideal curing of concrete even in freezing conditions. You’ve never pour concrete in the cold? Well, how would you like your curing process to go nearly three times faster? In either occasion, Powerblanket can help.

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The Grand Canyon Skywalk

Have you ever been to the Grand Canyon? If so, have you ever been on the Grand Canyon Skywalk? This marvel of technology and ingenuity is something worth experiencing.

 

The Grand Canyon Skywalk

Suspended in Awe

The Grand Canyon Skywalk was a personal project of the entrepreneur, David Jinohipadhus—involving Mark Ross Johnson as the architect of the undertaking.  It was completed in 2007 as part of a plan to extend a walkway out over the edge of the Grand Canyon as a new and exciting tourist attraction for the area.

The transparent, u-shaped, cantilever bridge is an exciting way to experience the Grand Canyon’s magnificent height and expanse. Suspended over a five-hundred-plus, vertical cliff, the walkway allows visitors to view the massive canyon with as little restriction as possible.

The bridge is 70 ft. long and 65 ft. wide, constructed with four layers of a material known as Saint-Gobain SSG Diamant, low-iron glass, along with an interlayer of DuPont SentryGlas. If you’re likely to question the durability or weight-bearing characteristics of a glass walkway, then perhaps this next tidbit will rest your worries. The glass itself is created to support a 100 lbs per square inch load and was manufactured to withstand significant seismic activity. What’s more, the foundation of the Skywalk is said to be capable of holding the same weight load that 71 fully-loaded Boeing 747s would produce.

 

The Powerblanket® Contribution

While Powerblanket® didn’t have a hand in the original construction of the Skywalk, we do make a contribution to its proper maintenance on a regular basis. When most people think of the Grand Canyon and the state of Arizona, they think of extreme heat and dryness, but certain areas of the state can receive good amounts of precipitation—even snow—and the west region of the Canyon (where the Skywalk was built) happens to be one of those areas.

That’s why any time there’s snow in the forecast, the responsible crew of the Skywalk applies Powerblanket® products to the glass walkway. Not only would snow or frost embed the view of the canyon below, but it would also make for a very slippery situation. Thankfully, Powerblanket® provides the even heat distribution necessary to keep the walkway operable during the cold weather stints it sees during certain times of the year. So, thanks to great ingenuity of the designers of the Skywalk and the minds behind Powerblanket® technology, this great attraction offers visitors a Grand experience year round.