Concrete Curing Time

Waiting for the curing of concrete can easily test patience, especially when you’re ready to move on to the next step of a project. However, it’s important to remember that quality is the end goal, not quickness. Rushing ahead and not allowing enough time for concrete to properly cure before allowing foot traffic or heavy machinery to travel across your newly placed cement can seriously compromise the integrity of a concrete slab.

 

Cement Curing Factors

Several factors influence concrete slab cure time, including:

 

Typical Concrete Setting Time

Typically, concrete is recognized to have reached full strength 28 days after placement; however, this does not mean you need to wait 28 days to walk, or even continue construction on newly placed concrete. After placement, concrete increases in strength very quickly for 3-7 days, then gradually for the next 3 weeks. This means that concrete hardening time is typically 24-48 hours, at which point it’s safe for normal foot traffic. After one week, concrete is typically cured enough to handle continued construction including heavy machinery.

The “70 in 7” Rule

When in doubt, remember the “70 in 7” rule: Most concrete mixes will have reached 70% of specified compressive strength after 7 days. At this point, it’s ready for exposure to normal traffic.

Concrete Curing Blankets

Unfortunately, cold weather during winter months can seriously slow down concrete cure time and significantly hold up construction projects. Luckily, solutions, such as concrete curing blankets that maintain optimum temperatures during cure time, are available. Concrete Blankets are an effective option that cure concrete 2.8 times faster than a typical insulated blanket and properly maintain moisture throughout the hydrating process. Concrete Blankets are easily transported and installed and maintain ACI compliance for cold-weather concreting. If you’re looking for a solution to maintaining optimum concrete cure time during cold winter

Powerblanket Receives the AME Award

Powerblanket Receives The Association for Manufacturing Excellence Award

The Association for Manufacturing Excellence (AME) today announced four recipients of the AME 2017 Excellence Award. The AME Excellence Award primarily recognizes North American manufacturing plants that have demonstrated excellence in manufacturing and business. The award acknowledges continuous improvement, best practices, creativity and innovation. Recognized among those four recipients is Powerblanket, the smallest company ever to receive this award.

Powerblanket – Salt Lake City, Utah

The leader in total temperature control, Powerblanket designs and manufactures high technology smart controls and monitoring devices, heating blankets, and chilling products that solve a wide range of temperature problems in industries such as oil and gas, construction, industrial, mining, and railroad. The AME assessment team highlighted Powerblanket’s great culture throughout the company. The team also commended Powerblanket’s improvements and impressive turnaround, especially for only being three years into its lean journey. The award presentation will take place on Oct. 25, 2017.

How It All Started

Powerblanket is a great example of problem solving and innovation in industry. A concrete worker in Salt Lake City, UT wanted to work more efficiently year-round. He worked with an engineering professor at the University of Utah to create an efficient heating technology that would cure concrete quickly and with maximum strength. They developed an innovative concrete heating product and founded Powerblanket, which soon became a leading manufacturer in the concrete industry.  This technology proved to solve many temperature problems for applications across many different industries, and they began wrapping barrels, buckets, pipes, and tanks. From there they developed an expertise in temperature control, built a world-class custom design team, created control devices, and entered the industrial cooling industry with a new line of chillers and cooling blankets.

What started as a solution to a common constructi

on problem, has turned into an industry-leading company that engineers and manufactures temperature control solutions for many different industries all over the world.

More About the AME Award

The AME Excellence Award has a rigorous selection process that begins when a company submits an extensive achievement report based on the AME Excellence Award evaluation criteria. Achievement reports are evaluated by the AME award assessment team. For companies that score high enough in this achievement report review, an intensive site visit is completed, during which a volunteer team of manufacturing practitioners validates the submitted achievement report. Recipients of the Excellence Award are selected based on the combined results of the achievement report review and site visit feedback.

The AME Excellence Award is not something that can be achieved by one person or one company leader. It takes all team members working together to achieve the level of enterprise excellence that the AME Excellence Award recognizes. With that in mind, AME representatives will visit award recipients’ facilities to present awards in person so that everyone working in these facilities can participate in the celebration.

Recipients will also be honored at the AME 2017 International Conference, taking place Oct. 9-13 in Boston, Mass. Recipients will share their best practices with other lean and continuous improvement practitioners in attendance.  

To learn more about the Excellence Award and the 2017 recipients, visit www.ame.org/excellence-awards.

How Cold is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?

What Temperature is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?

Experts agree that the best temperature to pour concrete is between 50-60 °F. The necessary chemical reactions that set and strengthen concrete slow significantly below 50 °F and are almost non-existent below 40 °F. Even when daytime temperatures are within the satisfactory range, winter concrete setting creates risks that could result in weak, inadequate concrete. If nighttime temperatures are below freezing, the water in the concrete will freeze and expand, causing cracks. Additionally, if temperatures reach below 40 °F (but not freezing) during set time, concrete will take much longer to reach required strength. However, if the correct measures are taken, concrete can still be successfully placed during even the coldest months of the year.

Things to Consider with Cold Weather Concreting

Before embarking on a cold weather concrete project, it’s important to determine any special strength requirements or considerations. This will help as you schedule your pouring and determine which strategies you will use to keep your surroundings and materials warm. The predominant challenge you will face during a winter concrete project is ensuring that the concrete sets before it is exposed to freezing temperatures. You might take the following suggestions into consideration as you plan your upcoming project:

  • Use heaters to thaw frozen ground, snow or ice.
  • Use hot water to mix cement.
  • Keep dry materials in a dry, warm location.
  • Use products designed to set quickly. During cold weather, these products will not set as quickly as the instructions may indicate, but will set faster than conventional materials.
  • Use additives that accelerate set time. Use caution; if additives contain calcium chloride, any rebar or metal wire mesh in concrete will rust and cause concrete to crack.
  • Use extra cement (typically 100 lb/ cubic yard) to make the reaction hotter and cause concrete to hydrate more rapidly.
  • Remember that you still need to wait for bleed water to evaporate. Incorporating the water into the surface during finishing will weaken the surface. Bleeding starts later and takes longer during cold weather; you can use squeegees or a vacuum to remove water quickly.
  • Wait until concrete has reached desired strength to remove any framework. If the framework is removed too early, the concrete will be damaged and the surface could collapse.

Maintaining Ideal Temperature

After implementing the above suggestions, It’s important to consider how you will keep concrete at the correct temperature during the curing process. Concrete must maintain a temperature above 50 °F for approximately 48 hours for the correct chemical reactions to take place. Two popular options used during cold weather concrete curing are heated enclosures and insulated blankets. If using an enclosure, ensure that the structure is both wind and waterproof. Additionally, ensure that there is proper ventilation for the space heater. Heaters cause an increase in carbon dioxide that could cause carbonation in the surface of the concrete.

Powerblanket Concrete Blankets

Powerblanket® concrete blankets are an extremely effective option for attaining and maintaining the correct temperatures for concrete pouring and setting. Powerblanket® concrete blankets can be used to thaw ground before pouring concrete and again after finishing to keep concrete from freezing. Utilizing Powerblanket® concrete blankets will ensure that concrete is kept at the correct temperature for the necessary reactions to happen quickly and the desired strength to be reached.

Heat Authority Sells Powerblanket

Find Powerblanket Products at Heat AuthorityHeat Authority

Heat Authority has researched the leading products for industrial and job-site productivity and offers the widest variety of heating and cooling accessories to make working in any environment easier and more efficient. Cold weather got you stuck? Unfavorable warehouse conditions? Hazardous area environment? Construction site issues? Need better equipment to get the job done? Heat Authority has a product to help solve your problem.

Heat Authority Has It All

With products for almost any industrial application, Heat Authority is one of the very best resources for industrial equipment supply. With a low price promise and FREE shipping on almost every product site-wide, Heat Authority offers heated concrete curing and ground thawing blankets, drum and IBC tote heated jackets, hot plates, furnaces, lighting, machinery, welders & generators, including freeze protection products and warehouse lighting solutions. Construction contractors and utility excavators rely on the light towers heated construction blankets. Warehouse managers and manufacturers demand the drum & tote heaters. Concrete finishers require the concrete curing heated blankets to keep their crews working all winter long.  Everybody loves the low price guarantee on EVERY product site-wide. Heat Authority knows that time is money and do their best to help their customers save money & stay on schedule all season long.

Great Distributor

Distributors like Heat Authority are vital to the success of Powerblanket, and we appreciate and value these partners for all they do to help us deliver heating solutions all over the world. If you are in search of Powerblanket heating solutions, Heat Authority is a trusted and reliable source.

Powerblanket Heating Solutions at Heat Authority Include:

  • Bucket Heaters
  • Tote Heaters
  • Barrel/Drum Heaters
  • Concrete Curing Blankets
  • Bulk Material Warmers
  • Propane Tank Heaters
  • Pipe Warmers
  • Ground Thawing Blankets
  • Spray Foam Heaters
  • Hot Boxes
  • DEF Tote Heaters
  • Tank Heaters

 

What Temperature is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?

What Temperature is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?
What Temperature is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?

What Temperature is Too Cold to Pour Concrete?

Experts agree that the best temperature to pour concrete is between 50-60 °F. The necessary chemical reactions that set and strengthen concrete slow significantly below 50 °F and are almost non-existent below 40 °F. Even when daytime temperatures are within the satisfactory range, winter concrete setting creates risks that could result in weak, inadequate concrete. If nighttime temperatures are below freezing, the water in the concrete will freeze and expand, causing cracks. Additionally, if temperatures reach below 40 °F (but not freezing) during set time, concrete will take much longer to reach required strength. However, if the correct measures are taken, concrete can still be successfully placed during even the coldest months of the year.

Before embarking on a cold weather concrete project, it’s important to determine any special strength requirements or considerations. This will help as you schedule your pouring and determine which strategies you will use to keep your surroundings and materials warm. The predominant challenge you will face during a winter concrete project is ensuring that the concrete sets before it is exposed to freezing temperatures. You might take the following suggestions into consideration as you plan your upcoming project:

  • Use heaters to thaw frozen ground, snow or ice.
  • Use hot water to mix cement.
  • Keep dry materials in a dry, warm location.
  • Use products designed to set quickly. During cold weather, these products will not set as quickly as the instructions may indicate, but will set faster than conventional materials.
  • Use additives that accelerate set time. Use caution; if additives contain calcium chloride, any rebar or metal wire mesh in concrete will rust and cause concrete to crack.
  • Use extra cement (typically 100 lb/ cubic yard) to make the reaction hotter and cause concrete to hydrate more rapidly.
  • Remember that you still need to wait for bleed water to evaporate. Incorporating the water into the surface during finishing will weaken the surface. Bleeding starts later and takes longer during cold weather; you can use squeegees or a vacuum to remove water quickly.
  • Wait until concrete has reached desired strength to remove any framework. If the framework is removed too early, the concrete will be damaged and the surface could collapse.

After implementing the above suggestions, It’s important to consider how you will keep concrete at the correct temperature during the curing process. Concrete must maintain a temperature above 50 °F for approximately 48 hours for the correct chemical reactions to take place. Two popular options used during cold weather concrete curing are heated enclosures and insulated blankets. If using an enclosure, ensure that the structure is both wind and waterproof. Additionally, ensure that there is proper ventilation for the space heater. Heaters cause an increase in carbon dioxide that could cause carbonation in the surface of the concrete.

Powerblanket® concrete blankets are an extremely effective option for attaining and maintaining the correct temperatures for concrete pouring and setting. Powerblanket® concrete blankets can be used to thaw ground before pouring concrete and again after finishing to keep concrete from freezing. Utilizing Powerblanket concrete blankets will ensure that concrete is kept at the correct temperature for the necessary reactions to happen quickly and the desired strength to be reached. With Powerblanket, it’s almost never too cold to pour concrete!

Compressed Gas Sizes

How long does concrete take to set

How long does concrete take to set?

If you really want to know the truth, concrete never stops curing; it continually hardens forever.  However, for practical purposes, it reaches a point where further hardening will be so slow it becomes unnoticeable.  In this article, we cover the basics of what you need to know about “how long does concrete take to set.”

 

Concrete Never Stops Curinghow long does it take concrete to set

The continual hardening occurs because cement particles react with the water in the mix (hydration), and as long as cement is in contact with moisture, even miniscule bubbles, it will continue to form bonds.  This is minimal after “full strength” is achieved, but it is continual.  

 

Curing Time for Concrete

In standard industrial cases, full strength concrete is recognized at 28 days.  At seven days, you should have concrete that is cured to 70% full strength or greater.  But to answer the question of, “How long does concrete take to set?”, concrete setting time is generally 24 to 48 hours.  At this point the neighborhood dog will not leave his footprints in it, but you should keep it clear of heavy equipment during this time period. Most mixes are cured at 28 days.

 

Factors Affecting Concrete Setting Time

  • Moisture plays a critical role in curing time for concrete.  If there is not sufficient water in the mix, the concrete will cure too fast, resulting in weaker overall strength.  Too much moisture, often used in the finishing step will weaken the top layer and cause flaking.
  • Hot ambient temperatures and wind accelerate the evaporation of moisture–speeding concrete setting time.
  • The mix design has a lot to do with concrete setting time.  Some jobs will require accelerants because the area needs to be usable as soon as possible.  The accelerant will do its job and speed up the concrete setting time.  Accelerant mixes will show a weaker overall strength in the end, but will still meet strength requirements.

 

Powerblanket Concrete Blankets

If you are wondering about how long does concrete take to set, Powerblanket has a solution for your concrete setting needs.  If you are dealing with HOT conditions and your concrete setting too quickly, consider Powerblanket ICE.

Powerblanket ICE is portable cooling equipment that will keep newly poured concrete safe from heat, regulating concrete setting time in both regular and hot conditions.

The Powerblanket ICE Circulation Blanket is combined with either a cooler or chiller to achieve optimum results. The Circulation Blanket draws heat to the blanket in order to cool the concrete.

  • Use Powerblanket’s patented heat-spreading technology in reverse–the cooling blanket draws heat away and lowers the temperature of the concrete.
  • Take it with you on every jog.  It is easily portable.
  • Blanket cover and insulation are the same as the robust system used in Powerblanket heating products
  • Control the curing speed of newly poured concrete even in hot conditions

If conditions are cold, Powerblanket concrete curing blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete effectively and confidently. Powerblanket curing blankets increase production by rapidly curing with consistent, even heat.

  •  Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional, insulated blankets
  •  Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  •  Easily installed and removed
  •  Produce cold weather concreting strength of up to 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  •  Prevent a freeze cycle
  •  Thaw ground and frost from job site before you pour
  •  Reduce downtime & increase profitability
  •  Maintain ACI compliance for cold weather concreting

Powerblanket ICE

 

Concrete Curing Temperature Makes a Difference

How Warm Does it Have To Be To Pour Concrete?

Whether the conditions are hot or freezing, the ideal concrete curing temperature should be maintained at about 55°F to achieve the optimum concrete strength.

Curing the Hoover Dam

At its completion in 1935, the Hoover Dam was the largest dam in the world and a marvel of labor and engineering.  The first pour began on June 6, 1933. Rather than being a single block of concrete, they built the dam as a series of individual columns. The trapezoidal columns rose in five foot lifts. This method allowed the tremendous heat produced by the curing concrete to dissipate. If the dam were built in a single continuous pour, the concrete would have gotten so hot that it would have taken 125 years for the concrete to cool to ambient temperatures. The resulting stresses would have caused the dam to crack and crumble away (The Story).  

The heat and dryness of Nevada posed additional complex problems with the pour and concrete curing temperature.  When the concrete was first poured, river water circulated through cooling coils of 1″ thin-walled steel pipes. Once the concrete had received a first initial cooling, chilled water from a refrigeration plant on the lower cofferdam circulated through the coils to finish the cooling (The Story).

Concrete Curing is an Art

We live in a world where faster always seems better; however, concrete that cures too quickly or under hot concrete curing conditions can actually result in weak or unstable concrete.  If concrete is cured in cooler ambient  temperatures (32°F to 50°F) with moisture continually present, strength gain will be slow but the concrete will eventually reach a high strength. Concrete should not be allowed to get hotter than 90°F or to dry out during the curing period.

Best Concrete Curing Temperature

By “best” we mean “most thoroughly,” not the fastest.  High temperatures mean faster curing, but fast curing equates to weaker strength in the end.  The following study by Paul Klieger in the Portland Cement Association Research Bulletin 103 illustrates this concept.

concrete cure time chart with concrete curing temperature

Concrete Cure Time Chart with Temperature

At an age of 1 day the 120°F concrete was strongest and the 25°F concrete was weakest. By 7 days the high-temperature cured concretes had no more strength than the 73°F concrete or even less. By the age of 28 days the high-temperature concretes were weaker than the 73°F concrete. From 28 days to 1 year the 55°F concrete was considerably stronger than the 73°F concrete. All of this suggests that, provided there is continuous curing, concrete cured at about 55°F for the first 28 days ultimately reaches the highest strength (Concrete).

Hot Weather Concrete Temperature Limits

Hot weather concreting doesn’t simply involve temperature.  High ambient temperatures, winds, and relative humidity all play a role in “hot weather.”  Under hot heather conditions, the primary curing issue is having the top of the slab of concrete dry much faster than the bottom. As concrete dries it shrinks. This means that the top will be shrinking while the bottom is not. This creates internal problems with the concrete that will result in a damaged slab. The top and the bottom of the pour need to cure at the same rate (Placing).

Concrete Curing Temperature Solutions

Is it too HOT?

Powerblanket ICE is portable cooling equipment that will keep newly poured concrete safe from heat.  Portable, insulated, and efficient, Powerblanket ICE effectively regulates the temperature of concrete under both regular and hot conditions.

The Powerblanket ICE Circulation Blanket is combined with either a cooler or chiller to achieve optimum results. The Circulation Blanket draws heat to the blanket in order to cool the concrete.

  • Use Powerblanket’s patented heat-spreading technology in reverse–the cooling blanket draws heat away and lowers the temperature of the concrete.
  • Blanket cover and insulation are the same as the robust system used in Powerblanket heating products
  • Portable
  • Control the curing speed of newly poured concrete even in hot conditions

Is it too COLD?

Powerblanket concrete curing blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete effectively and confidently in the cold weather months. Even in warm weather, Powerblanket curing blankets increase production by rapidly curing with consistent, even heat.

  •   Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional, insulated blankets
  •   Produce cold weather concreting strength of up to 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  •   Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  •   Easily installed and removed
  •   Prevent a freeze cycle
  •   Thaw ground and frost from job site prior to pour
  •   Reduce downtime & increase profitability
  •   Maintain ACI compliance for cold weather concreting

 

Concrete Curing Temperature

Works Cited

Concrete Construction Staff.  “Best Curing Temperatures”. Concrete Construction Magazine. 16 May 2017. http://www.concreteconstruction.net/how-to/best-curing-temperatures_o

“Placing Concrete in hot or cold weather”. Sakrete Blog. 16 May 2017. http://www.sakrete.com/media-center/blog-detail.cfm/bp_alias/Placing-Concrete-in-hot-or-cold-weather

“The Story of Hoover Dam – Essays”. Bureau of Reclamation. 16 May 2017. https://www.usbr.gov/lc/hooverdam/history/essays/concrete.html

 

Hot Weather Concreting Made Easier

Hot Weather ConcretingHot weather concreting

Hot weather concreting problems are most often encountered in the summer; however, any condition that increases curing rates and strips the concrete of moisture is considered hot weather concreting.

Pouring Concrete in Hot Weather

With temperatures rising and summer approaching, attentions shift from protecting concrete from the cold to concreting in hot conditions.  When pouring concrete in hot weather, special procedures should be followed for proper mixing, placing, finishing, and curing.  High ambient temperatures, high concrete temperatures, low relative humidity, and/or high winds impair the quality of freshly mixed and recently placed concrete (Hot).  Pouring concrete in hot weather affects laboratory test results, showing that higher temperatures affect the compressive strength gain of hardened concrete. Even though concrete poured in hot weather will produce higher early strength but as time goes by, the ultimate strength will be lower than expected (Rodriguez).

Water Loss

Hot weather concreting causes increased setting rates and rapid water loss.  Shrinkage and cracking are usually associated with hot windy weather.   The major side effect of faster curing and water loss is decreased overall concrete strength.  It is critical to prevent moisture from evaporating from the concrete surface. The evaporation rate removes surface water necessary for hydration , and thermal cracking may result from rapid changes in temperature, ie. pouring concrete on a hot day followed by a cool night (CIP 12). Proper mix design can compensate for these conditions, and in combination with protective measures to prevent rapid evaporation, quality concrete can be poured in hot temperatures (Rodriquez).

Adding water can increase concrete workability. However, adding water beyond the amount required by the approved mix design increases the water to cement ratio. This, in turn, can result in decreased compressive strength and an increased chance of cracking (Hot).

Recommendations for Hot Weather Concreting

Preparation is key and there are several basic precautions that can reduce the damaging effects of hot weather on concrete:

  • Use mix designs that are less susceptible to the effects of hot weather. The use of low-heat-of-hydration cement and certain admixtures (such as hydration retarding and/or water-reducing admixtures) are two standard approaches.
  • Keep concrete as cool as reasonably possible. ACI 305R does not state a maximum “as-placed” or “as-delivered” concrete temperature, but 90° F is commonly used. Substituting chilled water or shaved ice for a portion of the required mix water can help.
  • Limit the amount of time between loading the concrete at the plant and placement/finishing at the site.
  • Limit water addition at the job site, except to adjust slump upon arrival (when permitted by mix design).
  • Avoid or limit hydration accelerating admixture use.
  • Schedule large concrete pours in the early morning or evening when temperatures are cooler and have the manpower available to complete the job as quickly as possible.
  • Use temporary wind screens and water misting nozzles to reduce surface moisture loss (Hot).
  • Consider using a concrete cooling blanket to both retain moisture and protect the concrete’s surface from high ambient temperatures.

Powerblanket ICE Concrete Cooling

Powerblanket ICE® is portable cooling equipment that will keep newly poured concrete safe from heat.  Portable, insulated, and efficient, Powerblanket ICE effectively regulates the temperature of concrete under both regular and hot conditions.

The Powerblanket Ice Circulation Blanket is combined with either a cooler or chiller to achieve optimum results. The Circulation Blanket draws heat to the blanket while also cooling the concrete.

  • Blankets use Powerblanket’s patented heat-spreading technology in reverse–the cooling blanket draws heat away from the drum and lowers the temperature of the concrete.
  • Blanket cover and insulation are the same as the robust system used in the Powerblanket heating products
  • Powerblanket Ice industrial cooling systems are portable (120VAC required)
  • Control the curing speed of newly poured concrete even in hot conditions

Hot Weather Concreting

 

Works Cited

“CIP 12 Hot Weather Concreting”. NRMCA. 5 May 2017. www.nrmca.org/aboutconcrete/cips/12pr.pdf

“Hot Weather Concrete”. Engineering Consulting Services.  5 May 2017. www.ecslimited.com/blog/hot-weather-concrete

Rodriguez, Juan. “Pouring Concrete in Hot Weather: Tips and Tricks”. The Balance.  5 May 2017. www.thebalance.com/pouring-concrete-in-hot-weather-845030

 

Powerblanket Curing Blankets at the Statue of Liberty

Powerblanket® Goes to the Statue of Liberty

Reilly Construction out of Wrightstown, NJ won a bid from the U. S. Department of the Interior, National Parks to replace the roof of The Great Hall Statue of Liberty National Monument.  The Great Hall, which now houses the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, is considered one of the most symbolically important structures in American history. The Great Hall-Ellis Island was proclaimed a part of Statue of Liberty National Monument and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  Reilly nee
ded extra heat in the form of curing blankets to make this job happen.

 

The project involved removal of the existing inverted roof membrane assembly (IRMA) and replacement with a new multi-ply modified bitumen roofing system over a complicated tapered insulation deck assembly, approx. 60,000 Sq. Ft. The project also included the replacement of custom fabricated copper flashings and accessories throughout and the installation of a lighting protection system. Reilly worked with the NYS Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) to coordinate all the work.

 

Challenges Faced by Reilly

  •     Cold winter weather and high winds at this waterfront facility
  •     Working safely around thousands of tourists visiting this historic landmark daily
  •    Implementing various overhead protection plans at this historic landmark daily
  •    Mobilizing materials and equipment on a small island
  •    Limited laydown and staging areas
  •    Coordinating construction schedule with NPS & U.S. Park Police for VIP visits
  •    Ensuring compliance with the NYS Historic Preservation Office (SHPO)
  •    Day & night work


Finding Powerblanket

Dan DeSantis, the Senior Project Manager for Reilly, found Powerblanket products online and left his contact information. Upon follow up, we discovered that Reilly needed a heating solution to cure the masonry block work at the proper temperature (~50°F/~10°C) during December in New York and with the added chill of the water. Reilly used five Powerblanket MD0520 concrete curing blankets for the application, and appreciated the increased temperature control.

A Cure for What Ails You

Powerblanket concrete curing blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete effectively and confidently in the cold weather months. Even in warm weather, Powerblanket curing blankets increase production by rapidly curing with consistent, even heat.

Why Choose Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets?

  •    Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional, insulated blankets
  •    Produce cold weather concreting strength of up to 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  •    Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  •    Easily installed and removed
  •    Prevent a freeze cycle
  •    Thaw ground and frost from job site prior to pour
  •    Reduce downtime & increase profitability
  •    Maintain ACI compliance for cold weather concreting


5 Helpful Tips for Winter Construction Efficiency

5 Tips for Winter Construction

Working outside during the cold winter months presents many obstacles; however, some jobs will not wait for better circumstances. Below are some tips and solutions to improve winter construction.

1) KEEP YOUR EMPLOYEES SAFE

Train your employees in proper winter construction precautions.  Encourage everyone to wear layers of loose-fitting clothing, to stay dry, and to protect from the wind and sun with gloves, hats and sunscreen.  If conditions become too cold/dangerous, employees should have access to shelter.

On the work site, remove ice and snow regularly to prevent slips and falls.  This can be a full-time job depending on the weather.  The act of shoveling snow can also be extremely strenuous, especially for those individuals who do not engage in regular cardiovascular activity. According to the Cleveland Clinic, approximately 11,000 people seek shoveling-related hospital treatment each year for injuries (93%) or cardiac issues (7%). To save time, energy, and your employees health, use Summerstep heated safety mats to keep the walkways on your construction site clear.

Summerstep Snow Melting Mats

  • ,  Protect personnel from winter weather conditions and keep stairs, doorways, walkways, and ramps free from snow and ice
  •   Prevent slips and falls
  •   More convenient than shoveling snow
  •   More effective for snow and ice melting than harsh chemicals (less damaging to the environment, reusable, won’t damage concrete or other flooring surfaces)
  •   Will melt approximately 2 inches of snow per hour when operating
  •   40 Watts/Sq ft heated area
  •   The ONLY snow melting mat product made in the USA

learn-more-summerstep-01

2) MAINTAIN INTEGRITY OF CONCRETE

Winter construction cold-weather operations aren’t just about safety. While most construction tasks can be carried out in cold weather, some operations, such as concrete work, can take much longer and even fail without proper precautions.

 

If concrete is to reach necessary strength levels, it can’t be allowed to freeze for the first 24 hours after being poured or placed. Sheeting the concrete can ensure the required temperature and moisture necessary for curing, if the weather isn’t too severe.  In severe conditions, supplemental heating systems or enclosures must be brought in to maintain the integrity of the concrete.

 

Powerblanket Concrete Blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete in the cold weather months, save you time and money, and come in various lengths and sizes. We have you covered.

 

Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets

  •   Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional insulated blankets
  •   Produce cold weather concreting strength of 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  •   Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  •   Easily installed and removed
  •   Maintain ACI compliance for cold-weather concreting  Certified to UL and CSA standards

learn-more-concrete-blankets-01

3) DON’T LET FROZEN GROUND SLOW YOU DOWN

When it’s cold and the ground freezes, the job suffers.  Often prep for winter construction takes longer than the actual job.  Some industrial companies try heating the ground with massive coils or large heating systems, which become expensive and cumbersome. This approach requires rental fees and transporting equipment.  

Powerblanket has considered the difficulties and delays associated with winter construction and cold/freezing temperatures and has created a solution.  With Powerblanket’s patented heating technology you can prep the ground with little to no effort or supervision on your part.

Powerblanket ground thawing blankets have a higher power density and hotter temperature than our concrete curing blankets. The higher power is iideal for ground thawing applications and curing epoxy or resins.

Why Powerblanket Ground Thawing Blankets?

  •   High power density thaws frozen ground quickly
  •   Remove frost prior to concrete pour
  •   Melt snow and ice from roofs, walkways, and construction areas
  •   Easily placed and removed for repeated use in harsh winter weather
  •   Can be used to cure epoxy and resins
  •   Certified to UL and CSA standards

learn-more-ground-thawing-01

4) KEEP MATERIALS WARM

Masonry, roofing, paint, and plaster/stucco materials are all sensitive to cold weather.  Maintaining the integrity of these materials is critical for their success in winter construction.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes save you money by keeping your products from freezing without the risk of overheating. The Hot Box pallet warmer is easily assembled, taken apart. Hot boxes are ideal for cold wea
ther storage, freeze protection, transporting, job site heating, remote location use, and winter roofing. Standard Hot Boxes hold product between 100°F and 120°F (38°C and 49°C) and optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be precisely controlled.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes:

  •   Quick and easy assembly
  •   Preserve temperature sensitive material
  •   Heat materials and palletized products: adhesives, shingles, paint, caulk, resins epoxies, etc.
  •   Access doors on two sides.
  •   Certified to UL and CSA standards

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5) USING A PROPANE HEATER

Winter construction professionals often use temporary, propane-powered heating equipment on the jobsite, making it easier to finish projects on time and on budget. In addition to providing more comfortable working conditions, propane-powered heaters can also maintain the ambient temperatures necessary for common tasks like drywall installation or painting. However, like any portable heating device, propane-powered heaters must be used and maintained properly.

When temperatures get too low, the propane will not flow consistently or effectively, and you may lose your heat altogether. Propane-tank efficiency will fall substantially as the temperature drops. As the temperature drops, so does the pressure in your propane tank, and the pressure in your propane tank directly affects the volume of propane you have to work with. Your extraction rate (how quickly and smoothly you can extract propane from the tank) will suffer as well. Without a heating source to assist in the pressure maintenance of your tank, you will have to keep it as full as possible in order to keep it working, even if temperatures are mildly cold.

Powerblanket Propane Tank Heater

Powerblanket has the best propane tank heating solution on the market. These heating blankets will help maintain pressure and efficiency on just about any size tank. All Powerblanket heating blankets are certified to UL and CSA safety standards

Benefits of Powerblanket Propane Tank Heaters:

  •   Increase performance and efficiency of propane tanks
  •   Eliminates unnecessary cylinder refills in cold weather
  •  Even heat distribution in the areas where it is needed most
  •   Save money by optimizing gas and material usage
  •    Certified to UL and CSA standards

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