How Can I Prevent My Propane Tank from Freezing?

Propane tanks will freeze up when the ambient temperature drops below -44°F. This is because propane has a boiling point of -44°F. If the temperature is not greater than -45°F, your propane will not vaporize, and your tank will freeze. However, as the temperatures drop, and the volume of propane in your tank drops, as will your pressure. If you do not have a heating source, it is important to keep your propane tank as full as possible at all times, to avoid freezing.

Pressure RatesPropane tank temperature efficiency

Another situation that can cause a propane tank to freeze up is pressure rate. Drawing more pressure than your tank is designed for, or pulling large amounts of pressure in a short amount of time will result in freezing.

Keep It Full by Keeping It Warm

You can prevent your tank from freezing by keeping it full, which means filling your tank more often. This option may be expensive and annoying.  Or, you can look into heating systems. When researching ways to heat propane, safety is key. Try to find a heating method with safe heat, such as a heating blanket, or an insulated blanket, depending upon the amount of pressure needed. It is important to know how many watts are necessary to obtain the PSI levels desired or required.  If it is not possible to calculate this yourself, you will want to look for a solution that can provide that information for you before you make the investment.  Look for a heating solution that offers consistent heat and complete coverage.

Remember This

  • If possible, protect your tank from the elements
  • When the temperature drops, the pressure drops
  • The molecules in propane move rapidly as temperatures increase and slow down as temperatures decrease
  • Maintain a desirable tank pressure and avoid freezing with a heating source

No Open Flames

It is always important to remember when searching for a solution, to avoid open flames. Do not, under any circumstances, warm your propane tank with an open flame.  Propane is a highly flammable gas and heating it can be extremely dangerous. Also avoid products that are not temperature controlled, overheating a propane tank can cause the pressure valve to blow, which will create a leak in your tank.

Get the Propane Guide

Freezing Temperature Solutions

 

Cold weather often has adverse effects on equipment and materials, especially when the job requires everything to go smoothly. Without an effective solution to these freezing temperature problems, projects stop, time and money are lost, and jobs suffer. Powerblanket is driven to provide the best heating and cooling solutions no matter the industry or project.

Powerblanket drum and barrel heaters keep materials viscous.  Powerblanket concrete curing blankets ensure that the pouring season will go well into winter, preventing improper curing. And Powerblanket heated propane wraps and blankets maximize the efficiency and longevity of your resources. Our goal is to provide total temperature control for every process and every project, enabling you to do what you do best, regardless of the temperature outside.

Need to protect your propane tank from freezing? Give us a call and talk to a Powerblanket heating expert today. 888-316-6324, or visit our Propane Tank Heater page HERE.

 

 

 

Learn More About Propane Tank Heaters

Product Spotlight: Gas Cylinder Heaters

Do you store gas in cylinders? If so, then you know how the cold can affect them, even during this mild winter. In order to keep your storage from being compromised by a drop in temperature, you need a solution that can both insulate and heat. This is where Powerblanket® Gas Cylinder Heaters come into play.

 

Pressure and Depletion

Let’s face it, this is one of the mildest winters North America has seen in a very long time, but that doesn’t mean that it isn’t getting cold enough to affect equipment and resources left out in the dropping temperatures, even though they aren’t dropping as low as usual. As far as gas storage goes, if you’re storing it in gas cylinders, you’re likely keeping it outside, and if it’s outside, it’s going to lose pressure—causing depletion and problems with extraction.

When you store pressurized gas in cold temperatures, or any temperature below ideal, then the pressure in your tank is going to be far less than efficient. This is simply due to the molecules of gas moving closer together, just like in your car’s tires. And of course, as the molecules move closer together, the pressure drastically drops. This means when it comes time for extracting the gas from your tank or cylinder, you’re going to run into troubles; it’s going to seem like there isn’t as much gas in there.

 

Powerblanket® Gas Cylinder Heaters

Powerblanket® Gas Cylinder Heaters solve this problem by adding a protective barrier that both insulates and heats your tank or cylinder to the ideal temperature needed for optimal pressure maintenance. Powerblanket offers a range of gas cylinder heaters equipped for maintaining temperatures of propane, butane, nitrogen, oxygen, and other compressed gases. Powerblanket® Gas Cylinder Heaters offer uniform heat distribution across the entire cylinder. This revolutionary heating solution reduces costs by optimizing container temperatures and increasing cylinder efficiency.

What’s more, the Powerblanket® product line is designed for any heating job. Every product is built using a rugged vinyl shell that is safe to use in temperatures as low as -20° F. So in other words, Powerblanket products can keep your equipment protected well below freezing.

 

Standout Features

  • Increases performance and efficiency of gas cylinders
  • Provides even heat distribution
  • Saves money by optimizing gas and material usage
  • Safety certified by UL/CSA/CE
  • Eliminates unnecessary cylinder refills in cold weather

 

 


Welding Preheating

Welding Preheating

Prepping pipes and other surfaces for welding can be a real challenge since metal surfaces often need to be hot before you begin. If the metal isn’t hot enough before you start welding, it will affect the cooling rate. If a weld cools too quickly, the metal could go into shock and cause fabrication hydrogen cracking. There are many metal preheating methods. Some of these include: furnace heating, torching, electrical strip heaters, induction heating, and radiation heating, and welding preheat blankets.

Why Preheat Metal?

When you preheat and post-heat the metal, it allows for better hydrogen diffusion; up to 1000 times more diffusion at 250 °F (121 °C) than at room temperature (68 °F, 20 °C). Cracking risks reduce as more hydrogen diffuses after the weld is complete.

man in helmet welding pipes

Types of Heat Transfer

There are 3 main types of heat transfer: convection, radiation, and conduction. All 3 methods are useful in different applications. Let’s take a closer look.

Convection

Convection transfers heat around a space by the movement of molecules. For example, the rolling circular motion within a pot of boiling water is convection heating.

Radiation

Radiation is the transfer of heat through electromagnetic radiation. Radiant heating is what you can feel in the air when you sit around a campfire.

Conduction

Conduction transfers heat through direct surface contact. This is the most efficient heat transfer method to use when preheating a wide variety of metal surfaces for welding. Radiant heat will waste time and energy heating the air around the metal instead of the metal itself. Direct contact will ensure even, consistent heat over the surface of your welding materials.

Let’s compare 2 different welding preheating methods. Induction heating using radiation and heating blankets using conduction.

Induction Heating vs. Heating Blankets

Induction heating involves coiling a conductive metal object around the surface or container that needs to be heated. Electromagnetic currents then circulate and heat the object they surround. Once these metal coils are in place, they are not easy to remove and re-install. Induction heating is well suited for objects needing continual applied heat in a fixed, controlled location. Induction is commonly used in factories, where long strips of piping are continuously fed through the center of inductive heating coils.

However, for field work welding and on site repairs, induction is not a practical solution, especially in colder weather. Welding in a dynamic environment requires more portable and flexible preheating options. High temperature heating blankets are flexible enough to conform to and heat any metal in need of welding. They also use conductive heating that evenly distributes across the entire metal surface.

Powerblanket diagram on heat transfer in heating blankets

Welding preheat blankets are easily installed, removed, stored, and placed in another welding location.

Powerblanket Welding Preheating Solutions

High Temperature Heating Blankets

Powerblanket specializes in innovative heating solutions that fit a wide variety of surface shapes, and can be used in a myriad of locations. Our portable heating blankets come in every shape and size to accommodate any welding job.

Powerblanket diagram showing even heat distribution in our heating blankets blankets

Thick insulation and efficient heating spreading technology drive heat downward into your welding surface, eliminating hot and cold spots.

At Powerblanket, we also provide heating blankets that are certified to be used within hazardous locations. Safely preheat metals in C1D2 locations, so you can weld wherever needed.

Gas Cylinder Heaters

Our gas cylinder heaters and propane tank heaters are the perfect fit for tank welding jobs. With a large selection of sizes available, Powerblanket can fit and preheat any sized tank, even when welding in the coldest of conditions.

Contact us to find the perfect preheating solution for your welding needs at 866.945.4203 or [email protected]