DIY Roofing Repair

We live in the age of DIY and many home owners take great pride in accomplishing builds and repairs themselves. Let’s take a closer look at some how-to roofing repair basics.

DIY Roofing Repairs Basics

DIY Roofing Repair

Do Your Research

There are many different types of roofing styles and materials used in modern roofing today. The type of roof you have will dictate what tools are needed, warranty requirements, as well as care and handling instructions. Whether your roofing is ceramic, asphalt, concrete, metal, wood, slate, or rubber slate, be sure to research your tiles so that your roofing repair goes smoothly.

Find The Leak Inside

Leaks are often difficult to spot from the roof, so begin your leak inspection inside first. If it is not actively raining outside, you will need to look for water damage, mold, and mildew stains. Insulation easy shows water damage so keep an eye out for deteriorating insulation to find your leak site. Always make sure you use skin and eye protection when handling insulation.

If you are inspecting inside an attic or crawl space, watch for roofing nails that missed embedding in the rafters. Poorly shot nails can easily be affected by frost and water and cause leaks.

If you live in a very dry climate and can’t wait for rain in order to spot a leak, enlist a helper and a garden hose. Lightly wetting sections of the roof while someone searches inside can help you find your problem without waiting for mother nature’s assistance.

Find the Leak Outside

Once you detect the site of the leak, you can inspect from the roof itself. Once of the most common culprits is anything that penetrates the roof such as vents, plumbing, sky lights, chimneys, exhaust flues, etc. Look for signs such as deteriorated flashing, broken seals, missing shingles, cracked or curled shingles, or clogged gutters. Once you have identified the problem, mark it with something visible so you can easily find it again once you are ready to begin. Marking your damaged area also helps you avoid accidentally stepping on a section of roof that may have weakened.

Handle Shingles With Care

Roofing shingles and tiles interlock and overlap to prevent moisture from backing up against the house. For this reason, you may have to remove several shingles for even the smallest of repair jobs. Carefully removing and handling shingles and tiles means you can reinstall the good ones and remove the bad ones. Some shingles become brittle in colder temperatures so be sure to educate yourself on how to properly handle your particular roofing materials.

Tread Lightly

Professional roofers know how much pressure can be safely applied to certain areas of a roof. Working on a tilted surface can be quite precarious and can result in physical injury or further roof damage. Never step on areas damaged by water leakage. You should also learn how to properly stack your shingles and tiles on a roof during repairs to avoid damaging your materials or putting too much weight stress on your roof.

Repair All Your Layers

Once you have identified the leak site, you should assess how deep the water damage goes. Examine your tiles, shingles, felt paper, sheathing, flashing, frame work and insulation. Make sure any water damaged materials are completely removed and replaced to prevent mold and mildew. Properly adhere and seal any new materials you are using during the roofing repair.

The Perfect Drive

As you replace damaged roofing materials, make sure staples, nails, and other fasteners are properly driven. Crooked, under driven, and over driven nails and staples can leave gaps or holes where water can re-penetrate your roof.

Temperature Maintenance

Controlling the temperature of your materials can help you ensure properly driven fasteners. When adhesives,  shingles, and sealants are too hot, you run the risk of over driving nails into soft materials. When your materials are too cold and stiff, you run the risk of under driving nails into stiff and stubborn materials. Some roofing materials must be installed within a particular temperature range in order to preserve their warranty. Stay educated on the temperature needs of all the supplies needed to complete your roofing repair.

Some roofing tools like nail guns, staple guns, and air compressors will not work efficiently in cold temperatures. Cold weather makes it difficult for these tools to generate enough pressure to properly drive staples and nails. These tools, and corresponding air hoses, should be stored someplace warm before use to increase their performance.

When To Call The Pros

The importance of roof integrity and the inherent dangers involved in roofing repair, mean there are times when it makes financial and common sense to bring in a professional. Whether you run into trouble diagnosing or repairing a leak, be sure to have a professional roofing contractor’s number on hand. Some roofing manufacturers, like GAF, have a list of contractors that are certified specialists for a particular tile or shingle style. Using these services will mean you have access to roofing crews who are trained to handle your exact roofing materials. Let’s take a closer look at some scenarios that probably require professional help.

Can’t Find The Leak

Leaks can be very tricky to pin down when water is traveling along timber framing before it pools and drips. That means a leak site could be far away from where interior drips are actually forming. If you cannot 100% locate your leak, it may be time for an extra set of professional eyes.

Multiple Leaks

When it becomes clear your roof is suffering from many leaks, there could be darker structural problems at play. Widespread water damage on a roof makes it weaker and more dangerous to self-repair.

Safety Concerns

Know your limits and don’t be afraid to call it a day if roofing repair conditions become unsafe. If you do not feel like you have the equipment or the skill to attempt a self repair then find a trusted professional to handle it for you.

Powerblanket Roofing Solutions

BULK MATERIAL WARMERS

Storing shingles, adhesives, sealants, tools, compressors, and other roofing materials within proper temperatures greatly increases their usability and durability. Industrial Hot Boxes from Powerblanket protect temperature-sensitive materials during storage, transportation, and on the job site.

Our Hot Boxes provide uniform heat to all materials stored inside. This reduces the chance of having any hot and cold spots. Powerblanket specializes in winter construction solutions. Protect your roofing project from anything mother nature throws at you and keep jobs on schedule all year long. Contact us today to find the roofing solutions for your needs at 855.548.8013 or [email protected]

Stacking Shingles On A Roof

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Contractors save time by stacking several bundles of shingles on a roof before installing them. However, if stacked poorly, the shingles (or roof) can become damaged, which will adversely affect the overall longevity of the roof. Read on for some tips and tricks for stacking shingles on a roof.

Shingle Stacking Do’s And Don’ts

Weather Watch

Keeping a close eye on the weather will help you care for shingle stacks placed on the roof. Consider signing up for severe weather alerts so you can be warned of sudden temperature changes or in-coming storms.

Add ’em Up

Calculate how many shingles will be in each package, and how many stacks you can safely bring onto the roof at one time. Knowing how many shingles will be in each package will tell you their projected weight, and how to safely distribute them on the roof.

Gently Does It

Lightly lay the shingles on the roof flat. Leave them in the package for extra protection and so they stay together. With three tab shingles, which are thinner and lighter, you can lay them over hips or roof ridges.

Brace Yourself

If a roof has a high pitch, nail a board below where you’ll put the shingles to brace your shingle stacks. This will prevent them from sliding down, being a safety hazard, or knocking into other tiles and damaging them.

Share The Load

Lay your bundles in all different locations on the roof. This will both distribute the weight evenly to prevent damage, and make the shingles easier to access during your process, improving your workflow.

Be careful not to lay too many in one place, as this could create too much weight that might weaken the roof. If you are using laminate shingles (also known as architectural shingles), try not to lay them over ridges. Because they are thicker and heavier, they are more likely to compromise the integrity of the roof. Laminate shingles also have two-layers, which give them dimension. However, it also makes them more resistant to bending, and more likely to be damaged or misaligned between their 2 layers if dropped or bent over a ridge.

“Break” Carefully

Carefully break the bundles. Some roofers stack bundles over ridges with the intention of separating the asphalt shingles from each other. This is called “breaking the bundles.” It is crucial that this still be done gently, as the bundles could harm the roof if it is done forcefully.

Heat Protection

Keep your shingle bundles in the shade during sunny days and high temperatures. When it is time to bring them on top of the roof, try to keep them in the shade (i.e. a chimney or shaded area of the roof) if it’s available. Hot weather affects composite, asphalt, 3-tab shingles by making them more pliable. The shingle sealant is in the center of the bundle and is also heat activated. This might be problematic if it sets and makes the shingles stick together. Laminate shingles don’t tend to have this same problem since they have adhesive towards the edges. If you lay the asphalt shingles granule side up, the adhesive won’t stick as much and might help in being able to remove individual shingles from the bundle.

Cold Protection

Keep your bundles in a warm truck cab for as long as possible before use. Even better, get a bulk material warmer that will keep your shingles and adhesive warm enough to use around the clock. Cold weather has the opposite effect on shingles. It tends to make them more brittle and less flexible. Cap shingles that cover hips and ridges become especially sensitive to breakage if it’s cold.

Keep A Clean Site

You might initially start laying shingles on a clean surface, but make sure to be aware of any dirt or debris that might fly up onto the roof. If it gets into the adhesive, it will diminish its wind resistance significantly. Read more about wind damaged shingles here.

Don’t Stack Too High

A typical bundle weighs 75-80 pounds, which can quickly lead to a lot of pressure if you stack them on top of each other. Another reason to avoid stacking too many is to not risk them toppling over and becoming damaged. If you are using asphalt composite shingles, 9 stacked bundles is probably the limit.

Watch Your Placement

Try not to stack your roofing bundles in vulnerable places, such as in roof valleys. You will increase risk of damages your shingles.

Powerblanket Roofing Solutions

Bulk Material Warmers

Roofing crews must take care when stacking shingles, whether for storage or to prepare for installation. Ambient temperatures on a job site or a roof greatly affect the pliability and durability of roofing shingles. Stacking shingles in a location where you can closely control their temperature will preserve your materials and make them easier to work with. Storing shingles, adhesives, sealants and other roofing materials within proper temperatures greatly increases their usability. Industrial Hot Boxes from Powerblanket protect temperature-sensitive materials during storage, transportation, and on the job site.

Our Hot Boxes provide uniform heat to all materials stored inside. This reduces the chance of having any hot and cold spots. Powerblanket specializes in winter construction solutions. Protect your roofing protect from anything mother nature throws at you and keep jobs on schedule all year long. Contact us today to find the roofing solutions for your needs at 844.280.1276 or [email protected]

 

When Is It Too Cold to Roof?

WHEN IS IT TOO COLD TO ROOFThermometer in snow

When is it too cold to roof? It really is too cold to roof when temperatures are below 40° F (4 degrees Celsius. Many roofing products have adhesive properties that require the sun’s heat for activation. You risk a faulty roof install if you do not pay attention to the temperature outside. Continue reading for specific cold weather roofing tips.    

ASPHALT SHINGLES

The ideal temperature range to install asphalt shingles is between 70 and 80° Fahrenheit (21 and 27° Celsius). Below 70° F and the adhesive will not reach the ideal elasticity and will not create a perfect seal. Temperatures warmer than 80° can be problematic in the other direction. Asphalt shingles can become overly pliable and are susceptible to damage during installation. Contractors are more likely to overdrive nails, and foot traffic can erode the protective granular layer quite easily in extremely warm temperatures.

temperature illustration for ideal roof installation temperatureIf winter installation is unavoidable, most asphalt shingle manufacturers require a specialized adhesive manually applied to each shingle for temperatures below 40° F (4° Celsius). If shingles are applied below 40° without the specialized adhesive, you risk a voided warranty.

EPDM

EPDM (rubber) membrane roofing materials are even more temperature sensitive than asphalt (composition) shingles. EPDM is joined together using an extensive amount of adhesive. It requires high temperatures to be pliable enough to install and cure. EPDM adhesive is very thick and hard to work with even at high temperatures. So how cold is too cold to install a new roof? Manufacturers recommend the temperature be above 45° F  (7° Celsius) for installation. This recommended temperature is not very practical unless a warm storage area is available to keep the adhesive warm until the moment it is used.

WHEN IS IT TOO COLD TO ROOF?  POWERBLANKET HAS A SOLUTION

Powerblanket has a solution for your cold weather roofing needs. The Powerblanket® Hot Box will maintain the desired temperature of your shingles and adhesive on site, making a cold climate install much easier. While winter roofing is not ideal, Powerblanket makes it much easier than it has been in the past.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes save you money by keeping your products from freezing, without the risk of overheating. The Hot Box pallet warmer can be easily assembled, taken apart, and reassembled. Hot Boxes are ideal for cold weather storage, freeze protection, transporting, job site heating, remote location use, and winter roofing. Standard Hot Boxes hold product between 100°F and 120°F (38°C and 49°C) and optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be precisely controlled.

Powerblanket Pallet Warmers:bulk material warmers

  • Preserve temperature sensitive material.
  • Access doors on two sides.
  • Assemble quickly and easily.
  • Heat materials and palletized products: adhesives, shingles, paint, caulk, resins and epoxies, etc.
  • Certified to UL and CSA standards.

Learn about Hot Boxes

Sources:

“Cold Weather Roofing”. ProRoofing.com. 14 November, 2016. www.proroofingwisconsin.com/cold-weather-roofing.html.

Roofing in Cold Weather: Keep Asphalt Shingles Warm

ROOFING IN COLD WEATHER

If you live in the United States, it’s likely your roof has asphalt shingles. American homeowners use asphalt shingles more than any other roofing product. Proper installation of this material will provide many years of protection. Unfortunately, if you are roofing in cold weather, you will need to take some extra precautions.

SHINGLES NEED WARMTHRoofing in Cold Weather Damaged Shingles

As temperatures decline, shingles become more brittle, and are easily cracked and broken. Cracks lead to one thing: water leaks.

Years ago it was common for shingles to crack and blow away in wind storms. Manufacturers solved this problem with a self-sealing compound that cements one shingle to another (a thermoplastic compound). Introduced in the mid-1960s, it is a common ingredient of virtually every asphalt shingle manufactured.
The sealing compound is activated by the heat of the sun. This sealing can happen in colder temperatures, but direct sunlight is required. North sloped roofs may not get the necessary sunlight until spring/summer. When the bonding process is complete, the shingles are less likely to develop wind-related leaks and failures.

Roofing In Cold Weather Ideal TemperatureThe ideal temperature range to install shingles is between 70 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit (21 and 27 degrees Celsius). If temperatures are colder than 70 degrees, the adhesive will not reach the ideal elasticity and will not create a perfect seal.

If roofing in cold weather is unavoidable, most asphalt shingle manufacturers require that a specialized adhesive is manually applied to each shingle for temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius). Failure to apply the special adhesive in adverse temperatures will void the manufacturer warranty.

POWERBLANKET HOT BOXES AND PALLET WARMERS

Powerblanket has a solution for roofing in cold weather. The Powerblanket® Hot Box will maintain the desired temperature of your shingles and adhesive on site. Roofing in cold weather is not ideal; however, Pbulk material warmers for cold weather roofingowerblanket makes it much easier than it has been in the past.

KEEP IT WARM IN COLD WEATHER

Powerblanket Hot Boxes save you money by keeping your products from freezing without the risk of overheating. Hot Box pallet warmers are easily assembled and taken apart. Hot boxes are ideal for cold weather storage, freeze protection, transporting, job site heating, remote location use, and roofing in cold weather. Standard Hot Boxes hold product between 100°F and 120°F (38°C and 49°C), and optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be precisely controlled.

  • Heat materials and palletized products: adhesives, shingles, paint, caulk, resins, epoxies, etc.
  • Preserve temperature sensitive material.
  • Assemble quickly and easily.
  • Access doors on two sides.
  • Certified to UL and CSA standards.

 

Sources

“Cold Weather Roofing”. ProRoofing.com. 14 November, 2016. www.proroofingwisconsin.com/cold-weather-roofing.html.

Carter, Tim.  “Special Care Is Needed When Roofing in Cold Weather.”  Chicago Tribune. 2 January 2017. http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2000-12-16/news/0012160249_1_shingles-nails-roofing-materials