Putting a Roof Over Their Heads

A Brief History of the Roofing Industry

The Greeks and Romans were the first to experiment with different roofing styles. When they began to conquer parts of Britain, they utilized slating and tiling to endure the rainy climate. It is indisputable that a roof is an essential component of any dwelling.  Through innovation, there are many different roofing styles. Most of the changes in roofing materials have developed in the last 200 years. Although people generally still use the most available materials for the region. Wood and metal are used in the southern part of North America, slate in the northeast, wood in the Midwest and tile in the southwestern part of North America.

Now we are seeing technological advances in glass, polymer and smog absorbing tiles.

Timeline of Modern Roofing Materials and Systems

Most of the materials and systems available to us today began to take shape in the 1900’s.

    • 1896 – Barrett Manufacturing Co. developed the alternating application of layers to produce an impenetrable foundation that we know today. This changed the shape of buildings, allowing for roofs to take on both a flat and pitched appearance.
    • 1910– It is difficult to put a finger on who really created the asphalt shingle. The H.M. Reynolds Company of Grand Rapids, MI, claimed to have invented the product, but it’s hard to prove. However, asphalt shingles enter the story in the early 1900’s–making it possible to roll and stretch the compound into a material that could be cut into shingles. Since their conception, asphalt shingles quickly replaced wood shingles because of their endurance.
    • 1925 – Clay tiling is one of the oldest forms of roofing materials and predates asphalt shingles. Over the years it has been improved in both style and shape. By 1925, the product was rebranded as an “ancient” material and catalogs from that time give evidence of their popularity in residential architecture.
    • 1930 – Slate roofing was used in northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada where it’s readily available. Contractors encourage the use not just because it was available but it was impervious to the harsh weather conditions. It’s a weighted material that does well with steep pitches. The trend of slate took off in the 30’s and could be seen on many residential and commercial properties across the U.S.
    • 1936 – A manufacturing company from Nevada changed roofing materials for the better. Homeowners wanted the look of clay tiles but not the weight or the cost. W.F. Norman Manufacturing Co. utilized the flexibility of metal’s design to construct stamped sheet metal roof tiles. It was the bridge between functionality and design.
    • 1939 – Republic Steel Co. decided that small individual metal panels added unnecessary weight. So, they formed large corrugations that spanned a longer distance. It reduced the volume of metal needed to provide the superior protection they are known for delivering.
  • 1957 — Red Cedar Shingle Bureau.  Cedar shingles commonly topped residential structures through the 19th century but were supplanted in popularity in the 20th century by asphalt. The shingle typology has been revived in the 21st century for roofing and siding applications, typically in higher-end projects.

Roofing Today:  Issues Faced by Modern Roofers

Training and Workers in Roofing

There is some really good training that happens in the roofing industry today — and there is some really poor training, too. The NRCA offers several training options that can be completed online or in person and hands-on.  There is training for roofing technology, roofing safety and professional development. The resources appear to be available; however, contractors need to buy in to the importance of introductory and ongoing professional training.  It would also be highly beneficial if the industry had a training standard. This shift in attitude is what the roofing industry needs to recruit the kind of people needed in the industry.

One of the biggest challenge roofers face is finding workers at all levels. The United states is getting older as a county and roofing is not post-retirement work. The field workforce today is almost 60 percent Latino, and the current immigration climate is affecting roofers’ ability to employ workers. Without a recognized and standard training program, roofing fails to create a foundation and tell the story of how rewarding it can be.

Major Changes in Industry

There are two. One is referred to as the “green building” movement.  Thirty years ago, roofing technology was primarily concerned with keeping water out of buildings. Today, roofers must understand long-term thermal properties, reflectivity, vegetative roof systems and the integration of photovoltaics into roof systems. That’s a big change.  Along with understanding, roofers need to be aware of tax credits and different programs available in their areas that encourage more efficient and sustainable roofing systems.

The second major change is the natural vertical integration of the industry. Years ago, it was not uncommon for contractors, distributors and manufacturers to fight with one another. Happily, the industry is moving much closer to alignment in all sectors.

Pricing

Roofers need to find the balance in pricing to offer a fair price to customers while maintaining value in the business. A top quality roof along with a great experience for customers should not also be the lowest price.  The saying, “you get what you pay for,” is a truth in contracting and construction. Many roofing companies do not have big enough margins to even keep their company running for more than a few years, so it is important to establish a dependable and admirable reputation in order to have staying power.  

Safety

OSHA continues to pass more strict safety laws. It’s important to be looking ahead and plan for the future. Roofers do not always agree with everything that OSHA passes, but unfortunately that doesn’t change the fact that they are the ones who have the authority to enforce the laws.

Roofers must be educated about the latest safety requirements and implement them as necessary to keep your employees safe and your company safe from violations and fines.

Winter Roofing and Dancing with Temperature Demands

According to Mitch Dickinson, a roofing contractor, “A roof will look the best in the conditions it was installed.”  There are few professional roofers, if any, that would dispute that claim. A winter installation will always look the best in the winter.  A summer install is the same. Temperature has such a great impact on the materials, unless you live in a climate with little to no temperature fluctuation, your roof will experience changes.  Cold temperatures change the roofing game completely. There are multiple things to consider and plan for when the mercury drops and people need a roof over their heads.

  • Frost on Rooftops can set back start time, progress, and hamper safety of crew.  Most of the time crews tarp a roof, or roof section, one-two days prior to beginning a job to prevent frost.
  • When the shingle company delivers materials, they typically leave the shingles on the roof–ready for install.  If there is even a little frost, they will not deliver to the roof. This adds more time for the crew to move shingle boxes from the ground to the roof for install.
  • There are multiple pieces of roofing equipment that freeze up or quit completely under cold conditions:  compressors, nail guns, etc. Often a crew will take 10+ nail guns on a job because they freeze up and quit so frequently, and they don’t want the job to be stalled.  A new nail gun in the winter will sometimes only make it one job. Whereas, that same gun would have lasted all spring and summer and probably into the fall.
  • Being employed during the winter months is frustrating because crews will sometimes spend two hours shoveling snow off of a roof to only have four hours of good daylight to actually work.  And after shoveling the snow, they are exhausted and cold. January and February are not profitable months for roofers.
  • The expansion and contraction of materials is a big concern.  Vinyl siding, shingles, rain gutter, and metal roofing all expand or contract based on temperature.  Materials installed in the winter can/do buckle, curl, warp, and ripple in the heat of the summer. It is difficult to install materials in cold temperatures and account for the way they will grow in the heat.  Many winter jobs will inevitably require summer repairs/maintenance.
  • Some companies use an enclosed trailer with a heater to heat vinyl siding in the hopes that they can avoid excessive pitfalls of installing vinyl in cold conditions.  It’s an okay fix, but by the time the material is unloaded, cut, and properly installed it has lost a lot of the heat they worked to give it.
  • When the roof is cold and the ambient temperature is cold, adhesives are not only thick and hard to apply, they also won’t adhere to the roofing surface at all.  It’s almost like they lose their stickiness.
  • If a dump trailer that is full of materials is exposed to moisture, rain, snow, it often freezes and then it cannot be dumped until the whole trailer thaws.  
  • Most roofing materials are warranted as long as installed above 40°F.  When it’s cold, roofers cannot guarantee the viability of the product or install.

Winter Roofing Solutions

Many roofing companies have come up with their own creative methods for working in winter weather conditions.

  • To keep materials such as shingles and adhesives warm, some roofers will build a makeshift box that can house a heater in order to keep materials at a workable and warranted temperature.  This box may be a place to keep equipment warm as well.
  • Another solution for warming materials is to have a large enclosed trailer that has a heater. In this case, it is imperative to have proper ventilation if using a gas powered heater.
  • Tarping a roof a few days prior to starting a job will ensure easier snow removal and safety for employees when the job is started.
  • A frozen dump trailer, if warmed overnight in a heated shop, will enable dumping the next day.  You will have a giant puddle in your garage, but you will also have use of the trailer.
  • Powerblanket manufactures hot boxes, propane warmers and caulk warmers that can all prevent delays on the job.

Cold Weather Safety for Construction

Cold Weather Safety for Construction

The construction industry is a high risk industry, regardless of the time of year.  But when cold temperatures, snow and ice, and wind are added to the mix, precautions must be in place to protect your workforce, your equipment and materials, and the job.

Taking precautions and educating your employees on cold weather winter safety best practices can reduce the rate of illness, injury and dangerous accidents. Always emphasize “safety first.”

Cold Weather Safety Tips for Winter Construction

    1. Know the forecast and pay attention to changing weather conditions.  Today we enjoy the benefit of real time updates on our phones and computers.  When the weather outside is unsuitable for outside work, reschedule.  
    2. Limit exposure to the elements. Wind chill can take an existing temperature from workable to downright miserable.  And when wind and low temperatures are combined, it can be hard to reduce exposure for workers. Your employees were not made to be outdoors in these elements for long periods of time.  Schedule outside work in shorter durations. Break up larger projects into smaller tasks.
    3. Establish a warm break area. Outside work is absolutely unavoidable for the construction industry, but workers need a place away from the elements to take a break. A heated trailer or a tent with portable heaters and appropriate ventilation works great. Educate supervisors and workers on proper safety procedures with heating devices.
    4. Emphasize proper hydration.  We forget that our bodies sweat, even when it is cold outside, and especially when we are wearing extra layers of clothing.  Keep plenty of water on hand.  While many workers think caffeinated drinks will get them through, water is what the body really needs.  
    5. Require clothing that will keep workers warm and dry.  Boots with non-slip soles, heavy coats, gloves, and hats are all essential for protecting the body from severe cold weather.  Proper clothing is the first step in preventing hypothermia and frostbite and for cold weather protection.
    6. Know the signs of frostbite and hypothermia. Even when employers do everything they can to protect workers, issues can still arise. Supervisors and workers need to know the symptoms of hypothermia and frostbite so that if anyone shows these signs, they can receive immediate medical attention.
    7. Remove snow and ice. Check the job site early each day, before the work begins, for snow and ice accumulation and for any additional hazards.  Be prepared with salt or sand and remove large patches of snow and ice.  Snow and ice removal, if left to the crew, will slow down the job and deplete their energy.  
    8. Winterize and prepare vehicles. Before heading into the cold season, inspected all vehicles and equipment to determine if they are prepared for cold weather construction. Top off fluids, check tire tread and air pressure, and change filters.  Equip all vehicles with winter kits that contain an ice scraper, snow brush, shovel, tow chain, flashlight with extra batteries, emergency flares, a blanket, snacks and water.  Also, educate workers on what to do and who to call if they are stranded in a vehicle.protect critical construction materials
    9. Prepare and protect equipment. In addition to preparing vehicles for winter safety, smaller construction equipment also needs attention.  Air compressors work best in well-ventilated areas with an ambient temperature in the compressor system’s optimal range, typically 40-95°F. If the temperature around your compressor becomes too hot or too cold, the compressor may not start or may exhibit performance issues.  Moisture control also becomes a factor.  Moisture that becomes ice can accumulate and affect the way the system runs, blocking drainage and preventing efficient compression.  
    10. Protect Critical Materials.  Adhesives, concrete, shingles, paint, caulk, resins, epoxies, and other construction materials need additional protection during cold weather  construction.  Winter safety also includes keeping these materials at proper temperatures for application.  Failing to protect critical materials could result in shoddy work that affects the overall finished product.  

Put It in the Box

Hot boxes are ideal for cold weather construction safety, freeze protection, transporting, job site heating, remote location use, and winter roofing. Standard Hot Boxes hold product between 100°F and 120°F (38°C and 49°C) –optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow precise temperature control.

Powerblanket Hot Box Benefits

bulk material warmers

  • Quick and easy assembly
  • Easily transport from job to job
  • Preserve temperature sensitive material
  • Heat materials and palletized products: adhesives, shingles, paint, caulk, resins epoxies, etc.
  • Access doors on two sides.
  • Certified to UL and CSA standards

Hot Boxes and Cold Weather Construction Safety

  • Preserve temperature sensitive materials
  • Quickly and effortlessly install the compact portable design
  • Localize heat and save money by not heating a warehouse or building
  • Lower energy-related costs with the highly efficient design

 

IBC Tank Sizes and IBC Dimensions

IBC Tank Sizes

An ideal storage container, there are a variety of IBC tank sizes for your industrial needs. Intermediate bulk containers (IBCs), totes and tanks are ideal for storing industrial products in large quantities

What Do You Put in Your IBC?

 

Which IBC Tank Size Do You Need?

IBC tote tanks are an essential container for many industrial operations.  Hazardous materials, chemicals, and dangerous goods are stored in IBCs.  The food industry stores liquid, granulated, and powdered food ingredients, along with syrups, corn syrup, and molasses within IBC tote tanks.  They are ideal for solvents, detergents, or adhesives.  IBC tote tanks are even used for rooftop rainwater collection.

Such a versatile storage tool, IBCs are manufactured in plastic, carbon steel, or stainless steel and IBC sizes range from 180 to 550 gallons.

IBC tote and tank sizes

IBC tank dimensions vary; however, Powerblanket manufactures heaters for IBCs.

Powerblanket IBC Tank Heater Dimensions:

250 Gallon / 950 Liter 48’L x 42”W x 35”H

122cmL x 107cmW x 89cmH

275 Gallon / 1040 Liter 48”L x 40”W x 46”H

122cmL x 106cmW x 117cmH

330 Gallon / 1250 Liter 48”L x 40”W x 53”H

122cmL x 107cmW x 89cmH

350 Gallon / 1325 Liter 48”L x 42”W x 47”H

122cmL x 107cmW x 120cmH

450 Gallon / 1703 Liter 48”L x 42”W x 59”H

122cmL x 107cmW x 150cmH

550 Gallon / 2082 Liter 48”L x 42”W x 71”H

122cmL x 107cmW x 180cmH

 

How do you keep a barrel or IBC tank that is full of product at an optimal temperature? Powerblanket has the solution. Powerblanket heaters emit safe, consistent heat to ensure your IBC tanks are stored at optimal temperatures. Our standard IBC heaters fit 250 gallon, 275 gallon, 330 gallon, 350 gallon, 450 gallon and 550 gallon IBC tanks. Through our custom process we can manufacture heaters to fit any IBC. Easy to install, Powerblanket IBC heaters will save you time, money, and preserve your sensitive products, whether in storage or in transit.

Learn more about IBC tank heaters

Heat Authority Sells Powerblanket

Find Powerblanket Products at Heat AuthorityHeat Authority

Heat Authority has researched the leading products for industrial and job-site productivity and offers the widest variety of heating and cooling accessories to make working in any environment easier and more efficient. Cold weather got you stuck? Unfavorable warehouse conditions? Hazardous area environment? Construction site issues? Need better equipment to get the job done? Heat Authority has a product to help solve your problem.

Heat Authority Has It All

With products for almost any industrial application, Heat Authority is one of the very best resources for industrial equipment supply. With a low price promise and FREE shipping on almost every product site-wide, Heat Authority offers heated concrete curing and ground thawing blankets, drum and IBC tote heated jackets, hot plates, furnaces, lighting, machinery, welders & generators, including freeze protection products and warehouse lighting solutions. Construction contractors and utility excavators rely on the light towers heated construction blankets. Warehouse managers and manufacturers demand the drum & tote heaters. Concrete finishers require the concrete curing heated blankets to keep their crews working all winter long.  Everybody loves the low price guarantee on EVERY product site-wide. Heat Authority knows that time is money and do their best to help their customers save money & stay on schedule all season long.

Great Distributor

Distributors like Heat Authority are vital to the success of Powerblanket, and we appreciate and value these partners for all they do to help us deliver heating solutions all over the world. If you are in search of Powerblanket heating solutions, Heat Authority is a trusted and reliable source.

Powerblanket Heating Solutions at Heat Authority Include:

  • Bucket Heaters
  • Tote Heaters
  • Barrel/Drum Heaters
  • Concrete Curing Blankets
  • Bulk Material Warmers
  • Propane Tank Heaters
  • Pipe Warmers
  • Ground Thawing Blankets
  • Spray Foam Heaters
  • Hot Boxes
  • DEF Tote Heaters
  • Tank Heaters

 

When Is It Too Cold to Roof?

WHEN IS IT TOO COLD TO ROOFThermometer in snow

When is it too cold to roof? It really is too cold to roof when temperatures are below 40° F (4 degrees Celsius. Many roofing products have adhesive properties that require the sun’s heat for activation. You risk a faulty roof install if you do not pay attention to the temperature outside. Continue reading for specific cold weather roofing tips.    

ASPHALT SHINGLES

The ideal temperature range to install asphalt shingles is between 70 and 80° Fahrenheit (21 and 27° Celsius). Below 70° F and the adhesive will not reach the ideal elasticity and will not create a perfect seal. Temperatures warmer than 80° can be problematic in the other direction. Asphalt shingles can become overly pliable and are susceptible to damage during installation. Contractors are more likely to overdrive nails, and foot traffic can erode the protective granular layer quite easily in extremely warm temperatures.

temperature illustration for ideal roof installation temperatureIf winter installation is unavoidable, most asphalt shingle manufacturers require a specialized adhesive manually applied to each shingle for temperatures below 40° F (4° Celsius). If shingles are applied below 40° without the specialized adhesive, you risk a voided warranty.

EPDM

EPDM (rubber) membrane roofing materials are even more temperature sensitive than asphalt (composition) shingles. EPDM is joined together using an extensive amount of adhesive. It requires high temperatures to be pliable enough to install and cure. EPDM adhesive is very thick and hard to work with even at high temperatures. So how cold is too cold to install a new roof? Manufacturers recommend the temperature be above 45° F  (7° Celsius) for installation. This recommended temperature is not very practical unless a warm storage area is available to keep the adhesive warm until the moment it is used.

WHEN IS IT TOO COLD TO ROOF?  POWERBLANKET HAS A SOLUTION

Powerblanket has a solution for your cold weather roofing needs. The Powerblanket® Hot Box will maintain the desired temperature of your shingles and adhesive on site, making a cold climate install much easier. While winter roofing is not ideal, Powerblanket makes it much easier than it has been in the past.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes save you money by keeping your products from freezing, without the risk of overheating. The Hot Box pallet warmer can be easily assembled, taken apart, and reassembled. Hot Boxes are ideal for cold weather storage, freeze protection, transporting, job site heating, remote location use, and winter roofing. Standard Hot Boxes hold product between 100°F and 120°F (38°C and 49°C) and optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be precisely controlled.

Powerblanket Pallet Warmers:bulk material warmers

  • Preserve temperature sensitive material.
  • Access doors on two sides.
  • Assemble quickly and easily.
  • Heat materials and palletized products: adhesives, shingles, paint, caulk, resins and epoxies, etc.
  • Certified to UL and CSA standards.

Learn about Hot Boxes

Sources:

“Cold Weather Roofing”. ProRoofing.com. 14 November, 2016. www.proroofingwisconsin.com/cold-weather-roofing.html.

Winter Road Maintenance and Winter Road Construction

Winter Road Maintenance

Winter Road ConstructionWinter Road Maintenance

Typically, it is unwise to do any major structural winter road maintenance in the cold winter months.  Many professional paving companies joke that the best time to do winter repairs is in the summer.  Winter road construction is not so much dictated by the season, but rather by the temperature.  Warmer states have much longer active road construction periods than states with cold winters.  Without special engineering permission, most states prohibit paving in conditions below 45-50°F (for example asphalt conditions must be 50° and rising in Utah).  Never install asphalt or concrete on a frozen subbase; this will only ensure additional work for you when the conditions improve and you have to redo the job.  

 

Emergency Pothole Repair

For temporary repairs such as potholes use cold mix asphalt.  If the temperature is below the recommended level and it is an emergency, cold mix asphalt will work.  During this cold weather repair, remove all ice, moisture, and debris from the affected area using a heat source.  Keep in mind, this repair is meant to be temporary and should be permanently remedied when conditions improve

 

Winter Road Repairs: Crack Sealing

Crack sealing is actually preferred in colder months because pavements expand and contract with seasonal temperature changes. Consequently, cracks and joints are expanding and contracting when the pavements move. Crack sealing is a preventative winter road maintenance practice meant to extend the life of pavement. Since cracks on the pavement surface allow water and incompressible materials such as sand, dirt, and other debris to enter the pavement structure, these cracks can dramatically accelerate deterioration and weakening. Sealing cracks prevents further deterioration of the pavement and, when properly executed, can extend the life of the pavement anywhere from 6 months to 4 years. 

 

 

Crack Sealing Tips

  1. As recommended with the pothole repair, clear the crack of moisture, dirt, debris, vegetation and chemical deicers to make the sealing more effective, use a heat lance and/or compressed air.  If using a heat lance take care not to burn or scorch the pavement and the place the sealant before the pavement in the crack cools to allow for the best adherence of the crack fill materials.
  2. Seal all cracks from 1⁄4 inch to 1 inch in width the entire length of the crack. Cracks smaller than 1⁄4” will not retain sufficient sealer to flex in the cold. Cracks greater than 1” will sag and possibly prematurely fail without the installation of HMA or backer rod.
  3. When repairing cracks, fill the entire crack and level any affected area to ensure a smooth and level pavement surface.
  4. Apply the sealant or repair material only when the sealant or repair material is within the manufacturer’s recommended application temperature. Special care must be taken to assure that the sealant temperature does not exceed the manufacturer’s recommendations; otherwise the polymers may be destroyed therefore reducing the sealant performance.
  5. Keep in mind that more sealant is not always better. Over applying sealant material can lead to problems when paving over with HMA or bleeding up through the seal or paving application.
  6. New sealants are not designed to be “road glue”. They are very sticky and have tremendous bonding power; however, they were not made to “hold the road together”. Crack sealing has one objective: to prevent water from further damaging roads. Sealing “buys time” and saves money by delaying the expense of major reconstructive pavement work.

 

Powerblanket can help with Winter Road Maintenance

Whether you need a means for protecting temperature-sensitive materials in storage, or you need a heating solution for onsite temperature maintenance, the Powerblanket Hot Box will do the job.  This versatile heating solution accommodates remote-location use, job site heating, the transporting of temperature sensitive materials.  The revolutionary design of Powerblanket Hot Boxes provides uniform heat to all materials stored inside. This reduces the chance of having any hot and cold spots. If stored properly; chemicals, industrial products, and temperature sensitive materials will last longer and be more effective.

Winter road maintenance

5 Helpful Tips for Winter Construction Efficiency

5 Tips for Winter Construction

Working outside during the cold winter months presents many obstacles; however, some jobs will not wait for better circumstances. Below are some tips and solutions to improve winter construction.

1) KEEP YOUR EMPLOYEES SAFE

Train your employees in proper winter construction precautions.  Encourage everyone to wear layers of loose-fitting clothing, to stay dry, and to protect from the wind and sun with gloves, hats and sunscreen.  If conditions become too cold/dangerous, employees should have access to shelter.

On the work site, remove ice and snow regularly to prevent slips and falls.  This can be a full-time job depending on the weather.  The act of shoveling snow can also be extremely strenuous, especially for those individuals who do not engage in regular cardiovascular activity. According to the Cleveland Clinic, approximately 11,000 people seek shoveling-related hospital treatment each year for injuries (93%) or cardiac issues (7%). To save time, energy, and your employees health, use Summerstep heated safety mats to keep the walkways on your construction site clear.

Summerstep Snow Melting Mats

  • ,  Protect personnel from winter weather conditions and keep stairs, doorways, walkways, and ramps free from snow and ice
  •   Prevent slips and falls
  •   More convenient than shoveling snow
  •   More effective for snow and ice melting than harsh chemicals (less damaging to the environment, reusable, won’t damage concrete or other flooring surfaces)
  •   Will melt approximately 2 inches of snow per hour when operating
  •   40 Watts/Sq ft heated area
  •   The ONLY snow melting mat product made in the USA

 

2) MAINTAIN INTEGRITY OF CONCRETE

Winter construction cold-weather operations aren’t just about safety. While most construction tasks can be carried out in cold weather, some operations, such as concrete work, can take much longer and even fail without proper precautions.

 

If concrete is to reach necessary strength levels, it can’t be allowed to freeze for the first 24 hours after being poured or placed. Sheeting the concrete can ensure the required temperature and moisture necessary for curing, if the weather isn’t too severe.  In severe conditions, supplemental heating systems or enclosures must be brought in to maintain the integrity of the concrete.

 

Powerblanket Concrete Blankets provide a manageable way to cure concrete in the cold weather months, save you time and money, and come in various lengths and sizes. We have you covered.

 

Powerblanket Concrete Curing Blankets

  •   Cure concrete 2.8 times faster than conventional insulated blankets
  •   Produce cold weather concreting strength of 3,925 psi in 72 hours
  •   Maintain moisture throughout hydrating process
  •   Easily installed and removed
  •   Maintain ACI compliance for cold-weather concreting  Certified to UL and CSA standards

 

3) DON’T LET FROZEN GROUND SLOW YOU DOWN

When it’s cold and the ground freezes, the job suffers.  Often prep for winter construction takes longer than the actual job.  Some industrial companies try heating the ground with massive coils or large heating systems, which become expensive and cumbersome. This approach requires rental fees and transporting equipment.  

Powerblanket has considered the difficulties and delays associated with winter construction and cold/freezing temperatures and has created a solution.  With Powerblanket’s patented heating technology you can prep the ground with little to no effort or supervision on your part.

Powerblanket ground thawing blankets have a higher power density and hotter temperature than our concrete curing blankets. The higher power is iideal for ground thawing applications and curing epoxy or resins.

Why Powerblanket Ground Thawing Blankets?

  •   High power density thaws frozen ground quickly
  •   Remove frost prior to concrete pour
  •   Melt snow and ice from roofs, walkways, and construction areas
  •   Easily placed and removed for repeated use in harsh winter weather
  •   Can be used to cure epoxy and resins
  •   Certified to UL and CSA standards

 

4) KEEP MATERIALS WARM

Masonry, roofing, paint, and plaster/stucco materials are all sensitive to cold weather.  Maintaining the integrity of these materials is critical for their success in winter construction.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes save you money by keeping your products from freezing without the risk of overheating. The Hot Box pallet warmer is easily assembled, taken apart. Hot boxes are ideal for cold wea
ther storage, freeze protection, transporting, job site heating, remote location use, and winter roofing. Standard Hot Boxes hold product between 100°F and 120°F (38°C and 49°C) and optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be precisely controlled.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes:

  •   Quick and easy assembly
  •   Preserve temperature sensitive material
  •   Heat materials and palletized products: adhesives, shingles, paint, caulk, resins epoxies, etc.
  •   Access doors on two sides.
  •   Certified to UL and CSA standards

 

5) USING A PROPANE HEATER

Winter construction professionals often use temporary, propane-powered heating equipment on the jobsite, making it easier to finish projects on time and on budget. In addition to providing more comfortable working conditions, propane-powered heaters can also maintain the ambient temperatures necessary for common tasks like drywall installation or painting. However, like any portable heating device, propane-powered heaters must be used and maintained properly.

When temperatures get too low, the propane will not flow consistently or effectively, and you may lose your heat altogether. Propane-tank efficiency will fall substantially as the temperature drops. As the temperature drops, so does the pressure in your propane tank, and the pressure in your propane tank directly affects the volume of propane you have to work with. Your extraction rate (how quickly and smoothly you can extract propane from the tank) will suffer as well. Without a heating source to assist in the pressure maintenance of your tank, you will have to keep it as full as possible in order to keep it working, even if temperatures are mildly cold.

Powerblanket Propane Tank Heater

Powerblanket has the best propane tank heating solution on the market. These heating blankets will help maintain pressure and efficiency on just about any size tank. All Powerblanket heating blankets are certified to UL and CSA safety standards

Benefits of Powerblanket Propane Tank Heaters:

  •   Increase performance and efficiency of propane tanks
  •   Eliminates unnecessary cylinder refills in cold weather
  •  Even heat distribution in the areas where it is needed most
  •   Save money by optimizing gas and material usage
  •    Certified to UL and CSA standards

 

 

Winter Roofing

WINTER ROOFING AND POWERBLANKET HOT BOXES

HERE COMES THE SUNRoof with ice and gutter

Most roofing materials utilize adhesives that require warm weather (or an artificial heat source) to cure and fasten. This means the best time to replace a roof is during the warmer months. Usually, radiation from the sun would soften the adhesive, allowing it to seal the shingles together properly. Colder than 70 degrees and the glue stays too viscous, leading to weathering and erosion. Installing a roof in the winter, without the proper precautions, will lead it to fail quickly, if not immediately. In warm weather, the sun’s heat will properly bond most roofing materials: asphalt shingle (also known as composition shingle), EPDM (rubber) single-ply membrane, roll roofing, peel and stick roofing, and modified bitumen. It becomes more expensive and more difficult to apply these materials in cold weather.

ASPHALT SHINGLES AND ANY WEATHER ROOFINGwinter roofing temperature guide any weather roofing

If winter installation is unavoidable, most asphalt shingle manufacturers require that a specialized adhesive be manually applied to each shingle for temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius). If shingles are applied below 40 degrees without the specialized adhesive, the manufacturer will void any warranty. This is because a cold climate not only effects the adhesive, but the actual shingles are less flexible and more likely to break if dropped. To help avoid this, try leaving your product in a warm truck bed as long as possible before bringing it up onto the cold roof.

If you plan to do roof repair in winter, you need an artificial heat source to keep your asphalt shingles warm until installation. The best temperature to install a roof is between 70 and 80° Fahrenheit (21 and 27° Celsius). If it’s warmer than 80 degrees, asphalt shingles have the opposite problem of becoming overly pliable. This leads contractors to overdrive nails, and foot traffic to easily erode the roof. Consider leaving your shingles in shaded areas when the weather is too hot.

EPDM

EPDM (rubber) membrane roofing is even more sensitive to its environment than asphalt shingles. Like a composition roof, EPDM requires high temperatures to soften the adhesive needed for curing. Even at high temperatures EPDM can be difficult to work with because it is so thick. As a result, manufacturers recommend it be higher than 45 degrees Fahrenheit (7 degrees Celsius) to install EPDM. This temperature obviously isn’t very practical unless installers have a warm storage area to keep the adhesive pliable until it is used.

THINK INSIDE THE BOX: POWERBLANKET HOT BOXES

Bulk material warmer from Powerblanket

Powerblanket has a solution for your winter roofing needs. The Powerblanket® Hot Box will maintain the desired temperature of your shingles and/or adhesive on site, making the winter install much easier. While winter roofing isn’t ideal, Powerblanket makes it much easier than it has been in the past.

Powerblanket Hot Boxes save you money by keeping your products from freezing without the risk of overheating. Hot boxes are ideal for cold weather storage, freeze protection, transporting, job site heating, remote location use, and winter roofing. Standard Hot Boxes hold product between 100°F and 120°F (38°C and 49°C) and optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be precisely controlled. The Hot Box pallet warmer can be easily assembled, taken apart, and reassembled. This is useful for contractors that need to easily move the box to different job sites.

Powerblanket Pallet Warmers:

  • Preserve temperature sensitive material.
  • Assemble quickly and easily.
  • Heat materials and palletized products: adhesives, shingles, paint, caulk, resins and epoxies, etc.
  • Access doors on two sides..
  • Certified to UL and CSA standards.

Learn More Here Button

In depth information about roofing obtained from “Cold Weather Roofing.” ProRoofing.com. 14 November, 2016. www.proroofingwisconsin.com/cold-weather-roofing.html

and “How to Properly Stack Shingles on a Roof.” https://www.iko.com/na/residential/building-professional/how-to-stack-shingles-on-a-roof/

Freeze Protection For IBC Tote Tank

Benjamin Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Which means it’s time to consider how you are going to keep your IBC tote tank warm through the winter. Powerblanket tote heaters are an ideal solution for the freeze protection of your IBC tote tank.

Rather than panic when the weather turns cold, prepare now to prevent your materials from freezing. IBCs are a valuable resource for decreasing customer costs through reduced handling, storage space, and shipping expenses. They are easy to use, transport, and recycle.

powerblanket 275 gallon tote heater

IBC Tote Uses

Your IBCs may ship and store:

  • Bulk chemicals including hazardous materials or dangerous goods
  • Commodities and raw materials used in industrial production
  • Liquid, granulated, and powdered food ingredients
  • Food syrups, such as corn syrup or molasses
  • Petrochemical products, such as solvents, detergents, or adhesives
  • Rainwater when used for rooftop rainwater collection
  • Used IBCs are the basic building blocks for many home aquaponic systems
  • For more goofy uses for IBC totes check out this Youtube video

Tote Tips

There are a few common sense strategies for keeping IBC tank totes warm: stacking them if you have multiples and keeping them indoors, if that’s possible. However, even these strategies cannot guarantee freeze protection for IBC tote tanks with temperature sensitive materials.

Benefits of Using Powerblanket to Heat Your Totes

Powerblanket® Tote Heaters maintain optimal heating conditions for temperature sensitive materials.

HERE’S HOW:

  • Distribute heat evenly around the tote, without any hot or cold spots
  • Designed to be durable and weather resistant
  • Provide easy access with a removable top
  • Include an adjustable thermostatic controller, for precise temperature control
  • Safely heat and protect a wide variety of chemicals and materials

Stacks of IBC Totes

Standard sizes  fit the IBC 250 gallon, 275 gallon (1,040 liter), 330 gallon (1,249 liter), 350 gallon (1,325 liter) 450 gallon, and 550 gallon totes. Also in 120 vac and 240 vac.

Let Powerblanket ease the stress of winter by helping you plan your IBC tote tank freeze prevention.

Learn More About Tote Heaters

 

Heating Solutions for Roofing Material

Are you looking for heating solutions for roofing material? Whether you’re roofing in the spring, summer, fall, or winter, you need to keep your roofing material hot and ready to roll. From adhesives to mineral surfaced roll roofing, the Powerblanket® Hot Box can help you keep your roofing materials warm and ready year round with portable, easy-to-use heating solutions.

Powerblanket hot boxesHeating Solutions for Roofing Material: The Powerblanket Hot Box

Research has shown that installing roofing materials in cold weather can negatively effect the integrity of the roof. Cold temperatures lead shingle glues to have a higher viscosity. This means the glue is too hard to set the shingles together properly. The ductile-to-brittle transition seems to happen in temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit, and is usually when manufacturers void warranties for roofing products. With a recommended temperature of 70 to 80 degrees to roof, Powerblanket Hot Boxes and temperature controllers can solve the cold weather roofing dilemma.

Ideal temp for roofing materials graphicIn addition, the Powerblanket Hot Box (also known as the Bulk Material Warmer) is a great for countless applications. You can use the economical Hot Box for tar, adhesives, laminates, mineral surfaced roll roofing, and all other roofing materials. This will not only protect your supplies from freezing in cold weather, but will protect from inefficiency. By using the transportable and easy-to-assemble Hot Box and Beacon temperature controller, you can keep your materials at the ideal temperature regardless of what the weather is like.

Moreover, the Powerblanket Hot Box is designed with great structural integrity. Every unit comes with an internal, freestanding frame and can be easily assembled, disassembled, and reassembled. This makes the Hot Box ideal both for long-term storage of palletized product and on-site heating. Additionally, the option for an adjustable thermostatic controller gives you the ability to control the temperature range in order to prevent over or under-heating your product.

hot-box-one-cord, heating solutions for roofing materialPowerblanket® Hot Boxes:

  • Preserves temperature sensitive material
  • Installs quickly and effortlessly, and is compact and portable for storage
  • Heats palletized products: tar, resins, laminate, adhesives, mineral surfaced roll roofing, etc.
  • Features top and side access doors.
  • Is certified to UL and CSA safety standards

Learn More

Sources:

Anderson, David, Laurence Lapalu, Mihai Marasteanu, Yann Hir, Jean-Pascal Planche, and Didier Martin. “Low-Temperature Thermal Cracking of Asphalt Binders as Ranked by Strength and Fracture Properties.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board 1766 (2001): 1-6. doi:10.3141/1766-01.

“How to Properly Stack Asphalt Shingles on a Pitched Roof – IKO.” IKO Global. Accessed October 04, 2018. https://www.iko.com/na/residential/building-professional/how-to-stack-shingles-on-a-roof/.

Powerblanket® Hot Box and Curing Blankets for Post Curing


When it comes to post curing, maintaining ideal temperature is a must. And if you’re post curing small to medium sized parts, then you may find yourself using expensive ovens, or else taking a whole lot of time and money to build your own. Thankfully, you don’t need to do either of these with the Powerblanket Hot Box on hand.

 

Powerblanket Hot Boxes/Bulk Material WarmersThe Powerblanket Hot Box

Our Hot Box product (sometimes referred to as a Bulk Material Warmer) works great at maintaining the needed temperature for post curing small to medium sized parts. Its durable construction allows for secure and lasting installation, while its ease of setup makes it transportable and storable. The Powerblanket Hot Box can be easily assembled, disassembled, and reassembled. It gives you the option of bringing your parts to the Hot Box or bringing the Hot Box to your parts. Our Hot Boxes hold product at a temperature of up to 120° F, and the optional adjustable thermostatic controllers allow temperatures to be controlled with precision.
So if you need to keep your epoxy cures at temperature for prolonged periods of time, a Powerblanket Hot Box just might be the thing for you.

 

Powerblanket Hot Box pallet warmerOur Premium Hot Box (HB64PRO-1440) Offers:

  • A larger footprint (48” x 48”)
  • An internal steel frame (48” internal height)
  • The highest wattage (1440 Watts)
  • A controller for precise temperature regulation

 


heated curing blanketsPost Curing with Powerblanket Curing Blankets

Of course, after talking about the Hot Box, you may be thinking: “yeah, but what if what I need to cure is bigger than 48” x 48”? Well, there are two simple answers to this question. Depending on your application needs, we could build a custom size Hot Box for you. But if one of our flat curing blankets would work better, we would certainly suggest this as an option.

If you have curing needs that go well beyond what our Hot Boxes can handle, in regard to size and temperature, then our curing blankets are the ideal answer. Our high-temp flat blankets have high watt densities and produce higher temperatures for post curing epoxies and resins that require ranges beyond 100° F – 120° F, up to 400°F.  What’s more, these blankets can be made to cover large areas simply and effectively. So whether it’s carbon fiber construction, wind blade repair, floor coatings, or some other resin post curing application, Powerblanket has a solution for it.

 

 

Powerblanket Receives Manufacturer of the Year Award from UMA

If you haven’t seen this headline somewhere else on the web by now, we’re happy to tell you all about it here. Utah Manufacturers Association recently awarded Powerblanket something we’re pretty happy about. Read on to learn more about the UMA Manufacturer of the Year Award.

 

Brent Reddekopp  receiving UMA Award for PowerblanketUMA and Manufacturer of the Year

Utah Manufacturers Association (UMA), recently awarded Powerblanket the prestigious award  of Manufacturer of the Year. This award is given annually to the Utah-based manufacturer that proves to be the most innovative contributor to their space. There’s even more to it than this, but we’ll get to that.

UMA has been around since 1905. The organization prides itself on offering the “voice of industry” in the state of Utah, and they’ve been doing so for over 107 years now. UMA has clearly been talking Utah economy for a long time, but talking isn’t all they do. UMA is a trade association, and their goal is to enhance and improve the business climate in the state. UMA doesn’t only offer insight and expertise in the business of manufacturing, but the organization also has considerable experience in the legislative processes of state government. This is how they can do so much to vie for the interests of Utah businesses and the overall economic prosperity of the state.

UMA’s Manufacturer of the Year Award embodies the mission of UMA in multiple ways. By awarding the company that not only proves innovative in their respective markets, but also offers leadership in their industry, UMA’s award encourages and rewards the same idealism by which their organization operates. Powerblanket was chosen to receive this award for 2015, based on the embodiment of these characteristics and more. In fact, why don’t we just give it to you in their own words. According to UMA, Powerblanket received the award “for their outstanding performance in operational excellence, economic achievement, workplace safety, community outreach, and fidelity to the principles of free enterprise.”

Powerblanket is honored to receive such accolades from a high quality establishment like UMA. The credibility of UMA and the Manufacturer of the Year Award lends a great addition to our own image and ethos as a company devoted to “operational excellence, economic achievement, workplace safety, community outreach, and fidelity to the principles of free enterprise.”

So, from all of us here at Powerblanket, thank you, UMA for this great privilege.

 

Protect Your Agricultural Assets With Custom Heating Solutions

Forbes ran an article yesterday from Thomas Landstreet about the potential collapse in agricultural pricing. These estimations come at the cost of corn, pork, and beef especially. But whichever way the pendulum swings in the near future, one thing’s for certain: those in agriculture will need to safeguard their precious assets, and this could mean applying the proper custom heating solutions to help keep operating costs low.

 

The Agricultural Outlook

Protect Your Agricultural Assets With Custom Heating Solutions

According to Thomas Landstreet’s article on the matter, we should expect to experience a considerable drop in prices for the agricultural sector (that’s bad news) something Mr. Landstreet refers to as a retrenchment. So why the retrenchment, you ask? Well, according to Landstreet, there are two major factors that will contribute to the impending slide of the agricultural industry. One of them is something its faced time and time again, and that’s drought. Apparently the drought we passed through back in 2012 has created what Landstreet calls a bubble, one that he thinks will pop soon.

The second factor that is set to cause problems in the agricultural space is the ethanol mandate that allocated 40% of corn to creating an alternative fuel to petroleum. The effect of less corn going toward food supply has also contributed to the nearly bursting bubble. Whether the bubble bursts anytime soon or not, one thing is pertinent for the industry, and that is asset protection.

 

The Powerblanket® Contribution

If prices are to drop in the agricultural sector, then those involved in the industry are going to need to save on operating expenses where ever they can. Additionally, it’s going to be imperative to safeguard capital and resources. In the spirit of such, Powerblanket offers a myriad of possibilities in custom heating solutions for the agricultural space. So whether you need to keep large water tanks from freezing, propane storage at the ideal temperature, or DEF storage working in cold weather, Powerblanket has you covered.

Powerblanket custom heating solutions offer the most cost-effective and efficient heating solution on the market. With our patented approach to heating, we can ensure even heat distribution over the entire service area of application. What’s more, in case of temperature-sensitive storage maintenance, Powerblanket heating solutions actually add efficiency to the equation, such as in the case of our propane tank heaters. Add to this our revolutionary smart controllers and our new 3D scanning capabilities, and Powerblanket becomes the clear choice.

 

Download Propane Spec Sheet

The Perfect Candle Wax Heater

In the wax industry, heating applications aren’t used merely for freeze protection. In fact, more often than not, the most valuable aspect of a good candle wax heater is the ability it has to enable proper viscosity maintenance.

 

Wax candles

Viscosity and Its Challenges

When it comes to storing large amounts of wax in barrels or drums, vats or large baths, there is one matter that is of considerable importance and warrants plenty of time and attention. The matter we’re talking about is viscosity maintenance. Heating wax during manufacturing processes is essential for molding and purification. Though there are different stages of wax heating, it is important that the wax remain at certain levels of viscosity for reasons of workability.

Imagine the ease of use that could be created from a solution that would keep your candle wax at the proper viscosity both in storage and during manufacturing. Of all the wax heaters on the market, there are few, if any others at all, that can do what the Powerblanket® solution can do.

Powerblanket custom heating solutions enable equal and efficient heat distribution throughout the entirety of the application. In addition to this, Powerblanket heating blankets are equipped with thermostatic controls that allow you to set the proper temperature and walk away. There’s no need to babysit the heating process. With easy installation and simplified use, our heating solutions make viscosity maintenance a snap.

 

Powerblanket drum heater

Standout Features of Powerblanket Drum Heaters

  • Works with both steel and poly containers
  • Full wrap-around design provides complete insulation and ensures equal heat distribution
  • Delivers safe, uniform heat to expensive materials without overheating or burning
  • Design decreases and prevents product waste among temp-sensitive materials by maintaining consistent storage temperatures without significant fluctuations
  • Highly energy-efficient GreenHeat Technology™ and design lowers energy-related expenses and overall project and equipment costs

 

Download product catalog

A Drum Blanket Done Right

Of all the heating devices out there for the protection of drums and barrels, there’s one drum blanket that’s done right. With even heat distribution and temperature regulation, Powerblanket has a solution fit for any occasion.

 

A Drum Blanket Done Right

The Powerblanket Difference

Storing materials in drums is a simple idea. They hold a lot and offer a durable storage structure for liquids, chemicals, food product, and so much more. However, when it comes time for temperature regulation, they don’t provide any capabilities on their own. For this reason, some manufacturers have created elaborate insulation blankets to ward off the effect of cold temperatures. As much as these insulation blankets may seem to be a good idea, or as much as they might be able to help with a mild difference in temperature, they can’t adequately protect against extreme winter cold.

In addition to inadequately protecting your materials against savage cold, traditional insulation blankets also lack the ability to bring material to working temperature. Take, for example, the need for bringing certain types of product to temperatures above the ambient air around it. A typical insulation blanket has no way to accommodate this.

However, Powerblanket has created a drum blanket that can work in a myriad of applications. It can protect your most temperature-sensitive products against the coldest cold. What’s more, the Powerblanket drum heater also has the ability to bring your product up to working temperatures. With a thermostatic controller and innovative heat-spreading technology, you can wrap your drum and forget about it.

The ability to automate your freeze protection is a huge benefit once the cold weather rolls around, and the capability of bringing liquids and other products to higher temperatures for viscosity maintenance, chemical-property enablement, or characteristic integrity is of equal importance. So whether you need a drum blanket for insulation, temperature regulation, or a combination of the two, Powerblanket is the clear answer.

Winter Preparation: Now’s the Time

As the temperatures around the nation rise into the hundreds, cold-weather preparation may be the furthest thing from your mind. What’s more, there are plenty of warm-weather applications that Powerblanket technology is used for. But we would be completely remiss if we didn’t say enough of proper winter preparation. After all, when it comes to preparing for winter, you don’t want to be a grasshopper…

Aesop’s Fable: The Ant and the Grasshopper

Perhaps you’re already familiar with the old fable of The Ant and the Grasshopper from Aesop. If you’re not (and even if you are) we’ve recited it here. Below follows the most popular English renditions of the story:

“In a field one summer’s day a Grasshopper was hopping about, chirping and singing to its heart’s content. An Ant passed by, bearing along with great toil an ear of corn he was taking to the nest.

‘Why not come and chat with me,’ said the Grasshopper, ‘instead of toiling and moiling in that way?’

‘I am helping to lay up food for the winter,’ said the Ant, ‘and recommend you to do the same.’

‘Why bother about winter?’ said the Grasshopper; we have got plenty of food at present.’ But the Ant went on its way and continued its toil.

When the winter came, the Grasshopper found itself dying of hunger, while it saw the ants distributing, every day, corn and grain from the stores they had collected in the summer. Then the Grasshopper knew it is best to prepare for the days of necessity.”

Of course, the implications of this story can go far deeper than the need for good winter preparation. But for the sake of comparison, the story’s plot is rather poignant for the industries we serve. When cold weather does hit, it’s best to already have the systems and products you need in place to brave the effects of winter. So if you have assets to cover come late October, now’s the best time to start getting together the protection you’ll need.

Download product catalog

Cold Patch Asphalt Material Warming

Are you in the asphalt business in need of asphalt material warming, or some other industry where you need potable, easy-to-use product heating? Do you need temperature maintenance for sensitive materials? Whatever the case may be, the Powerblanket® Hot Box can help you prep your materials for application or warm your product to the ideal temperature.

 

Storing asphalt materials in a heated boxThe Hot Box for Asphalt Material Warming

Powerblanket is proud to introduce the  Hot Box (aka: Bulk Material Warmer) to its innovative line of Eco-Friendly heating solutions.  With the Hot Box, you have a heating solution for remote-location use, job-site heating, transporting temperature-sensitive material, and many other heat-related requirements.

The Powerblanket® Hot Box can save you money and time by keeping your products from experiencing the detrimental side effects of cold weather. However, the Hot Box can also bring your product up to working conditions, when you require temperatures above the ambient degrees. One of our favorite examples to share in regards to this is that of Vern Fiehler, owner of Quick Road Repair in Alaska, and it has to do with asphalt material warming.

Vern had to bring his asphalt repair product up to working temperature before it could be applied. Unfortunately, his previous method of heating the product was very inefficient, and caused some real problems. When Vern met with the field maintenance crew of the Juneau Alaska International Airport in order to demonstrate the product he called Instant Road Repair (IRR), what happened was nothing short of disastrous. For the demonstration, Vern needed to heat IRR. He used a forced-air, ceramic heater to do this. However, the product didn’t perform well at all during the demonstration. Vern discovered that this was due to overheating. In fact, the product overheated 40°F / 22°C past its maximum workable temperature. This ultimately cost him a whole pallet of his product and the embarrassment he experienced in front of the airport staff.

Vern’s product is a great one. And his IRR wasn’t the thing to blame for this untimely setback. Instead, the culprit was merely an unreliable heating solution. Since then, Vern uses the Powerblanket® Hot Box for efficient and regulated heating of IRR.

Like all our products, the Hot Box is very user friendly. It can be easily assembled, disassembled, and reassembled, making it the ideal answer for cold weather storage, freeze protection, job-site heating, remote location use, and many other use cases. Our Hot Boxes come in three performance levels: Lite, Standard, and Premium. Each unit will maintain temperatures between 100°F and 120°F. And in the case of the Premium Hot Box, you have the option of adding an adjustable thermostatic controller, enabling more precise temperature control.

 

Hot Box Features:

  • Preserve temperature sensitive material.
  • Install quickly and effortlessly.
  • Heat bulk materials and palletized products: paint, caulk, resins and epoxies, etc.
  • Side access doors.
  • Certified to UL/CSA/CE standards.