What Can Powerblanket Do For You?

Powerblanket leads the market on industrial heating solutions. If you can build it, haul it, or store it then we can heat it. Whether you need our ready-to-ship, insulated drum heating jackets, IBC tote heaters, and bulk material warmers, or you require a custom solution, we have the industrial heating solution for you. From freeze protection to process heating, Powerblanket has you covered.

What Powerblanket Can Do For You

Here at Powerblanket, we know how difficult it can be to keep the wheels of industry moving all year long. Weather and temperature restrictions creative costly “off-seasons” for many companies. With Powerblanket, there is no “off-season.” We are proud to help get the industrial manufacturing community back to work. Learn more about our winter-time heating solutions here.

Infographic on Powerblanket benefits

Let’s take a look at how we have helped our customers run efficiently all winter long.

Optimizes Your Operations

“We are extremely satisfied with the switch to Powerblanket drum heaters. Powerblanket’s unique technology allows our containers of coating materials to be heated evenly and quickly, opposed to band heaters, which concentrate heat in one spot and have charred our product, sometimes contaminating the entire container and rendering it unusable. Their barrel heaters protect the entire container from ambient conditions, thus maintaining optimal operating temperature. In fact, our customers successfully operate in the extreme cold conditions of North Dakota in un-insulated trailers thanks to Powerblanket drum blankets. They use considerably less power than band heaters, have temperature control capability, and are a top quality product.”

-Mike R. (Manager, Howard Marten Fluid Technologies)

Eliminates Downtime

Cenovus experienced much better run times last winter than previous winters despite last year’s winter being much more severe. “This included minimizing production downtime and minimized need for steamers to service the sites.”
-Mark S. (Coordinator of Field Production Operations)

Saves You Time And Money

“Your blankets are absolutely excellent. Our crews have been working on some cell tower projects in Michigan this January where it has been extremely cold. The project restricts us from being able to use power tools on the job sites so we were left to figure out how to dig without equipment. We are so glad that we found you guys! Thanks to Powerblanket Extra Hot blankets, we were able to lay them out the day before we needed to dig, and by morning the next day, the ground was thawed out and softened, making it easy to dig and get our job completed much more quickly. In fact, we estimated that your blankets have saved us approximately 10 hours on each site. On 10 sites to date, we estimate we have saved approximately $5,000 already! We have already paid off the initial investment of these blankets. When we are looking at thousands of sites, and with the savings we are saving per site, this is huge! We are excited at how much time and money your blankets have saved us and will save us in future.”

-Kim H. (OSP/COEI Operations Manager, Precision Utilities Group)

“It worked perfectly…It thawed about 14 inches down into the ground. The grass greened up and I was able to cut it up into strips and roll it up. The sod was in good shape and I stored it in our garage. After the burial we put the dirt back in and rolled the sod back out. Normally we tear the sod up and throw it away and replant it in the springtime…The Ground Thawing Blanket was exactly what we needed to break through the tough winter soil. It saved us hours of manual labor and nearly $100 in landscaping. I was really happy with it, and we’ll be using it again this year.”

-Wayne B. (Maintenance Supervisor)

Extends Your Working Season

“We didn’t have the time to wait out the winter for the temperatures to become more moderate. The Powerblanket concrete heating blankets certainly played an important role in keeping us on schedule and not having to postpone the pour on an important Kansas City bridge.”

-Dale H. (Project Manager, Massman Construction)

Protects Your Critical Materials & Equipment

“Your blankets have been wonderful to work with. Our totes are outside and have been kept warm and protected from the harsh conditions here in the cold Rocky Mountains. We have loved the functionality of these blankets because they are extremely easy to wrap around our totes, strap shut, plug in, and maintain desired temperature with the thermostatic controllers.

We have not had any issues with your blankets flaking, tearing, or ripping in any way, and have found it beneficial that they are water resistant as well. As the blankets have been prone to getting dirty, due to being outside, we have easily sprayed and wipe them down to help keep them clean and looking new.

We wanted to thank you for assisting us with our heating frustrations and keeping our totes and the material within, warm and protected. You have helped keep our company running efficiently and retaining profit. We love your blankets and would recommend them to anyone.”

-Eric (A Colorado Energy Company)

“I met with the field maintenance crew of the Juneau Alaska International Airport to demonstrate my product, Instant Road Repair (IRR). For my demonstration, I tried to bring the IRR up to a workable temperature by using a forced air ceramic heater. During my presentation, the product did not perform well and the product overheated 40° F/ 22° C above the maximum recommended temperature. It cost me the entire pallet of material, and I was also embarrassed. Since then, I use the Powerblanket tote heater.”

-Vern F. (Quick Road Repair, Alaska)

Fast Custom Heating Solutions

We know that when the temperatures drop, you need heating solutions right away. Don’t worry when tricky heating needs require special configurations, sizing, or temperature requirements. Many customers assume that customization is time consuming. That’s why Powerblanket is proud to provide the fastest custom ordering process on the market. Our team of world-class engineers provide you with a custom quote with 1-3 days, and custom orders shipped within 1-3 weeks.

Contact us today to gain the Powerblanket advantage over mother nature and get your operations running efficiently all winter long. Call us at 844.557.4482 or email us at [email protected]

Learn More About Powerblanket Solutions

Cold Weather Safety Tips for Outdoor Workers in 2019

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01


Cold Weather Safety Tips for Outdoor Workers in 2019

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01


Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01

Industrial Winter Safety

cold weather safety tips for outdoor workersStay safe with these cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers.

Cold Weather Safety Tips

  • Wear layered clothing
  • Stay hydrated, even when you think you are not sweating
  • Take regular breaks
  • Wear appropriate footwear
  • Understand signs and treatments for frostbite and hypothermia
  • Prepare your vehicle for winter driving
  • Clear snow and ice from walkways and paths

The leaves are falling and so is the temperature.  Winter will be here shortly.  While it is beautiful and enchanting, winter can pose some major hazards if you haven’t prepared for it.  Failing to recognize and respect the dangers of winter is not recommended.

Whether you are traveling through, working in, or enjoying the weather, the following cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers will ensure your safety and good health:

Wear Layered Clothing

Multiple layers of loose-fitting clothing allow the worker to adjust their comfort level and protection based on the current temperature.  Tight fitting clothes reduce blood circulation.  Many forget the danger of sunburn when it is cold outside, but it is always important to protect from the sun.  Wear a hat, scarf or face covering and always wear waterproof gloves.  The goal is to expose as little skin as possible.  Also, it is wise to keep a change of clothes with you in case your existing clothes get wet.   Being wet can increase the rate of heat loss from the body.

Stay Hydrated

It’s easy to forget the simple importance of hydration when it is cold outside.  It’s not like the steamy summer months when we know we are sweating.  You still sweat—even in cold temperatures. For optimal performance, keep the body hydrated with water.

Breaks are Good

When the weather is particularly cold and/or windy, regular breaks are important.  If possible, take a break inside or under shelter where you can warm up a bit.  If it gets very cold, get inside and warm up.

Wear Good Shoes

Wear proper footwear when tackling winter weather.  A pair of water resistant and insulated boots with rubber treads is important for industrial winter safety.  Slow your pace and shorten your steps when navigating snowy/icy walkways.

Know the Signs

Frostbite and hypothermia can set in unexpectedly.  Get inside if you begin to experience either.  If a co-worker seems to be manifesting signs of cold stress, help them get help immediately.  Be aware of those around you and take care of each other.

Frostbite causes loss of feeling and color around the face, fingers, and toes.

What to look for:

  • Numbness
  • White or grayish-yellow skin
  • Firm or waxy skin

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room/location.
  • Soak in warm water.
  • Use body heat to warm.
  • Do not massage or use a heating pad.

Hypothermia is an unusually low body temperature. A temperature below 95 degrees is an emergency.

What to look for:

  • Shivering
  • Exhaustion
  • Confusion
  • Fumbling hands
  • Memory loss
  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness

What to do:

  • Go to a warm room
  • Warm the center of the body first—chest, neck, head, and groin
  • Keep dry and stay wrapped up in warm blankets.  Do not neglect to cover the head and neck.

Proper Heat Ventilation

If using a non-electric heater, ensure that there is proper ventilation to let gasses like carbon monoxide escape.  Carbon monoxide poisoning is a silent, deadly killer claiming about 1,000 lives each year in the United States.

  • Install a carbon monoxide detector.
  • NEVER run generators indoors.
  • Open a window slightly when using a kerosene heater and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • NEVER use a gas oven to heat your home.
  • If your heat goes out, close off rooms you do not need, dress in layers of lightweight clothing, and wear a cap.

Prepare for Winter Driving

Top off your fluids, drive slowly and allow yourself additional time to travel.  Pay attention to changing road conditions.

  • Check your tires
  • Assess your battery
  • Top off your fluids (coolant, wiper fluid, oil, etc)
  • Have jumper cables
  • Pack a blanket/safety kit for emergencies

You never know when this preparation may save your life or the life of someone else.  This website is an excellent resource for winter preparation and survival, ready.gov.

Clear the Pathsnow melting mat cold weather safety tips for outdoor workers

Make sure that walkways, paths, stairs, and entries are free from snow and ice.  Do this as quickly as possible when a winter storm sets in.  Slips, trips, and falls will decrease dramatically when the path is clear.  Powerblanket offers a NEW method for clearing the path that does not use chemicals or salt, or require you to break your back shoveling.  Summerstep industrial snow melting mats use radiant heat technology to melt snow and ice on walkways, stairs and doorways, improving industrial winter safety.  Not only does Summerstep melt away the existing ice and snow, but as the storm continues, the path will stay clear as accumulating snow will instantly melt away.  Summerstep heated walkway mats can be linked together to match the length you need to ensure safe travels.  

Always use proper engineering controls, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment (PPE) required by your employer in all work conditions.

summerstep-learn-more-01